Posts Tagged ‘sin is sin no matter how you justify it’

1 Kings 9:1-9
The Lord’s Response to Solomon

I remember those days when I was a younger man but before I met Jesus Christ as my Savior and Lord at age 39. I grew up in the church. I was a preacher’s kid. I knew right from wrong. I knew what immorality was. Those things are seared in our hearts by God himself. However, as I grew up, it seemed as though compromises began. There were those times that I would participate in sinful behaviors but I would rationalize them away as OK one time. Then as time progressed and those sinful behaviors became more frequent, I would rationalize them away as God overlooking those sins because “he and I had a deal that this particular one was OK” because, well, you know (1) I was overall and generally a good guy and (2) that this was OK because of all the things that I had been through. After a while, those rationalizations become more widespread and cover more and more sins. This one is OK too. Well, I am doing this sin so it might as well be OK for me to do this one. Pretty soon, you become a person that you never thought you would be.

It was not until the night of my salvation on December 23, 2001 that I was really confronted by the Holy Spirit with the person that I had become. At that moment, there were no more rationalizations. There was just me and the nakedness of knowing that God and I did not have any deals. He is God and I am a sinner. At that moment, there were no more rationalizations. I stood before the Judge of my eternity and I was found lacking. Just one sin no matter how you rationalize it condemns us to hell. Not to mention all those “deals we have with God”. You know the sins that we will quit doing later. You know the sins that you will make up for with good behavior later. All that stuff you rationalize in your mind as OK are just meaningless when you stand naked with no defense before the pure, sinless Creator God who demands holiness for anyone to be in His presence in eternity.

Have you ever been there? Have you ever began saying that this sin is OK because you and God have a deal on that particular sin? You will quit this and that sin soon enough and God will forget about your sins and everything will be OK. But one sin slides into another type of sin that is OK since the last kind was OK and soon you are far from that innocent child you once were? Are you still rationalizing away that this sin is OK and that sin is OK? None of it is. You are just deluding yourself.

Even when we have accepted Christ as our Savior, we still sin. We still disappoint God with our rationalizations and our pride. Our only hope is repentance and laying ourselves at the feet of the slain and resurrected Savior, Jesus Christ. The only difference between the lost and the saved is ever growing repentance and recognition of our sins through the Holy Spirit’s action in our lives. What was once rationalized away is now revolting to us progressively over our lives as the Holy Spirit gradually sanctifies us to be more and more like Jesus as we mature in Christ.

That’s the thing that I thought of this morning as I read God’s response to Solomon. I am sure that at the time of his prayer, Solomon had full intentions of keeping God’s commands and doing his best to lived according to God’s Words. But one moral compromise led to another and then pretty soon Solomon was not the man that prayed the prayer in the previous passage. God warns him here of the cost of disobedience. It is the same with us. Let us read 1 Kings 9:1-9 now and learn what we can learn:

Chapter 9
1 So Solomon finished building the Temple of the Lord, as well as the royal palace. He completed everything he had planned to do. 2 Then the Lord appeared to Solomon a second time, as he had done before at Gibeon. 3 The Lord said to him,

“I have heard your prayer and your petition. I have set this Temple apart to be holy—this place you have built where my name will be honored forever. I will always watch over it, for it is dear to my heart.

4 “As for you, if you will follow me with integrity and godliness, as David your father did, obeying all my commands, decrees, and regulations, 5 then I will establish the throne of your dynasty over Israel forever. For I made this promise to your father, David: ‘One of your descendants will always sit on the throne of Israel.’

6 “But if you or your descendants abandon me and disobey the commands and decrees I have given you, and if you serve and worship other gods, 7 then I will uproot Israel from this land that I have given them. I will reject this Temple that I have made holy to honor my name. I will make Israel an object of mockery and ridicule among the nations. 8 And though this Temple is impressive now, all who pass by will be appalled and will gasp in horror. They will ask, ‘Why did the Lord do such terrible things to this land and to this Temple?’

9 “And the answer will be, ‘Because his people abandoned the Lord their God, who brought their ancestors out of Egypt, and they worshiped other gods instead and bowed down to them. That is why the Lord has brought all these disasters on them.’”

In this passage, we see that At the time God spoke to Solomon, in this text, I have no doubt that Solomon had the best of intentions of following the Lord as closely as he possibly could. His first compromise seemed like a rational thing to do. You remember, Solomon has asked God for wisdom that he might know how to lead the people, and God granted him unsurpassed wisdom. Now, I used to think that God gave Solomon “across the board” wisdom, in other words, wisdom in every area of life, but in reality, God gave him the wisdom that he asked for. He gave him political wisdom for judgement and leadership.

His personal wisdom for ordering his own life, on the other hand, came up terribly lacking. The reason for this is that he had to walk by faith, just as we all do. So, Solomon’s initial compromise was to marry some women for political advantage. Soon, he began to marry one king’s daughter after another, and in so doing, locking in a peace for his kingdom that he would enjoy for most of his life. The problem was, that many of these women were of nations with which God had expressly forbidden His people to intermarry.

Look at 1 Kings 11:4-8 and see how full blown it became in the end. Do you think Solomon ever dreamed this would happen, back in his younger days? He knew, in his head, that God had miraculously been with his father, David, and he had seen the blessings of God, as Israel had risen to be the greatest nation in the world. God had appeared to him twice, first in Gibeon in a dream, as recorded in 1 Kings 3:5-14, then the second time in our text. 1 Kings 3:3 says, “And Solomon loved the Lord, walking in the statutes of his father, David…” But, then the verse goes on to say, “Except that he sacrificed and burned incense at the high places.” Now look at 1 Kings 11:26-35. Solomon had become so deceived by his compromise, that he somehow thought he could worship other gods and continue in the blessing of Almighty God. David had been a man who would inquire of God before major decisions, and he would humble himself before God when he was wrong. Consequently, God said that David was a man after His own heart. Solomon, on the other hand, set out to rationalize his way through life. He forgot his own proverb, that God had given him, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not to your own understanding, but in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths” (Proverbs 3:5-6).

So, as you can see, it happened to Solomon and it brought trouble to his life. It was so bad that within a generation of his death, the kingdom was split into and was weaker for it and made it susceptible to the coming defeats and exiles at the hands of the Assyrians and the Babylonians. Sin and disobedience to the Lord always leads us to trouble. We may whine and complain about how hard we have had it, as I did in my younger days, but often the troubles that we suffer in life are a direct result of the sins in our lives. They always have consequences. Actions cause reactions. Causes always have effects. Sin and disobedience is no different. Sure, there are instances where the sins of others have effects on our lives where we have done nothing wrong but that is the world we live in – a fallen one. However, most of the rough patches that we go through in our lives are of our own making.

Here in this passage, the Lord tells Solomon and the Israelites (and is saying the same thing to us as the readers of the Bible in the 21st century) that there are choices that we can make. We can obey the Lord and receive His blessing or we can disobey Him and He will withdraw his blessing and let come what may to us in this fallen world.

Father, help us to not compromise our faith as if certain sins are OK temporarily because we have a deal with you. Help us not to rationalize our sins away. Help us to see our sins for what they are. Help us to repent and turn away from them and beg forgiveness from you through our Savior Jesus Christ. Help us to desire to obey you. Help us to understand from our own experience and the experience of others just how destructive unrepentant sin can be in our lives. Help us to desire what you desire. Help us to want to be more and more like Jesus Christ every day. Help us not to resist the changing power of the Holy Spirit in our lives.

Amen and Amen.