Posts Tagged ‘legacy’

2 Samuel 23:8-39 (Part 2 of 2)
David’s Elite Warriors

Glioblastoma. It was a word until yesterday that was not a part of my vocabulary. I did not even know that it was what caused the death of Senator John McCain a couple of weeks ago. Now, it is a part of our family’s vocabulary. The preliminary diagnosis of yesterday’s MRI is that glioblastoma is what is afflicting my 79 ½ year old father.

He had a mini-stroke two and half years ago in 2016 and at that time they saw a little tiny abnormality in his MRI then but no one was too concerned. My dad recovered from that pretty well. His speech patterns returned to normal. His mind got back to its quick-witted pace. He just moved a lot slower after the mini-stroke but, hey, he was 77 so…you are naturally going to move slower. However, here in the last six weeks his mental and physical state declined rapidly. Forgetfulness. Confusion. Bazaar behavior began cropping up. My stepmom, Sharon (my dad remarried about two years after my mom died in 2010. A romance of two who had lost long-time spouses to death), said that he would get stuck in memories of the past as if they were current events. He began to be unable to dress and bathe himself. All of these bazaar and peculiar behaviors, confused and nonsensical conversations, and detachment from reality came to a head this weekend. So much so that she had him transported to the emergency room to get more assistance from the medical world than she was getting from dad’s neurologist. During that visit, they decided to do an MRI. That scan revealed a large gray mass in his brain. The neurologist on-duty at the hospital, a long-time doctor, told my stepmom that his professional experience tells him that the mass is a glioblastoma cancerous mass. This type of brain cancer is really aggressive. It had grown from a pea size in 2016 to a noticeably large mass in 2-plus years. They will do a biopsy today (which means drilling into his skull near the mass and inserting a probe to analyze the mass and take tissue from it) to confirm the diagnosis. If it is true (which it most likely will be), the prognosis is not good. Typical sufferers from glioblastoma last 12-24 months after diagnosis. Due to its location, there is no real significant surgery that can be done. The only treatment is chemotherapy and radiation. There are about 5-10% of patients that have lived well beyond the typical 12-24 months but it is not common. There is a really small percentage that have fully recovered. At my dad’s age and state of general health, I am just not sure his body is up to the challenge.

All of that said and having shed a few tears over my once ten-feet-tall-and-bullet-proof-dad, it got me to thinking about my dad’s legacy. What is that? What will be said of my dad? His legacy I think is that he was a pastor first and foremost and that (now that I am in full-time ministry) he has two sons in full-time ministry. My brother has been a full-time pastor for thirty something years now and I am now (since 6 ½ months ago) a full-time pastor myself. You can say what you will about my dad. He was a flawed man for sure. But bottom line, his legacy is me and my brother. That will live beyond him. We grew up in it. My brother accepted it. I fought against it but eventually went into the “family business”. That’s the legacy.

That was the thought that came to mind when I read about David’s mighty warriors this morning in 2 Samuel 23:8-39. That thought being leaving behind a positive legacy, leaving behind disciples, is what we are all about as those who are the children of God:

8 These are the names of David’s mightiest warriors. The first was Jashobeam the Hacmonite,[a] who was leader of the Three[b]—the three mightiest warriors among David’s men. He once used his spear to kill 800 enemy warriors in a single battle.[c]

9 Next in rank among the Three was Eleazar son of Dodai, a descendant of Ahoah. Once Eleazar and David stood together against the Philistines when the entire Israelite army had fled. 10 He killed Philistines until his hand was too tired to lift his sword, and the Lord gave him a great victory that day. The rest of the army did not return until it was time to collect the plunder!

11 Next in rank was Shammah son of Agee from Harar. One time the Philistines gathered at Lehi and attacked the Israelites in a field full of lentils. The Israelite army fled, 12 but Shammah[d] held his ground in the middle of the field and beat back the Philistines. So the Lord brought about a great victory.

13 Once during the harvest, when David was at the cave of Adullam, the Philistine army was camped in the valley of Rephaim. The Three (who were among the Thirty—an elite group among David’s fighting men) went down to meet him there. 14 David was staying in the stronghold at the time, and a Philistine detachment had occupied the town of Bethlehem.

15 David remarked longingly to his men, “Oh, how I would love some of that good water from the well by the gate in Bethlehem.” 16 So the Three broke through the Philistine lines, drew some water from the well by the gate in Bethlehem, and brought it back to David. But he refused to drink it. Instead, he poured it out as an offering to the Lord. 17 “The Lord forbid that I should drink this!” he exclaimed. “This water is as precious as the blood of these men[e] who risked their lives to bring it to me.” So David did not drink it. These are examples of the exploits of the Three.
David’s Thirty Mighty Men

18 Abishai son of Zeruiah, the brother of Joab, was the leader of the Thirty.[f] He once used his spear to kill 300 enemy warriors in a single battle. It was by such feats that he became as famous as the Three. 19 Abishai was the most famous of the Thirty[g] and was their commander, though he was not one of the Three.

20 There was also Benaiah son of Jehoiada, a valiant warrior[h] from Kabzeel. He did many heroic deeds, which included killing two champions[i] of Moab. Another time, on a snowy day, he chased a lion down into a pit and killed it. 21 Once, armed only with a club, he killed an imposing Egyptian warrior who was armed with a spear. Benaiah wrenched the spear from the Egyptian’s hand and killed him with it. 22 Deeds like these made Benaiah as famous as the Three mightiest warriors. 23 He was more honored than the other members of the Thirty, though he was not one of the Three. And David made him captain of his bodyguard.

24 Other members of the Thirty included:

Asahel, Joab’s brother;
Elhanan son of Dodo from Bethlehem;
25
Shammah from Harod;
Elika from Harod;
26
Helez from Pelon[j];
Ira son of Ikkesh from Tekoa;
27
Abiezer from Anathoth;
Sibbecai[k] from Hushah;
28
Zalmon from Ahoah;
Maharai from Netophah;
29
Heled[l] son of Baanah from Netophah;
Ithai[m] son of Ribai from Gibeah (in the land of Benjamin);
30
Benaiah from Pirathon;
Hurai[n] from Nahale-gaash[o];
31
Abi-albon from Arabah;
Azmaveth from Bahurim;
32
Eliahba from Shaalbon;
the sons of Jashen;
Jonathan 33 son of Shagee[p] from Harar;
Ahiam son of Sharar from Harar;
34
Eliphelet son of Ahasbai from Maacah;
Eliam son of Ahithophel from Giloh;
35
Hezro from Carmel;
Paarai from Arba;
36
Igal son of Nathan from Zobah;
Bani from Gad;
37
Zelek from Ammon;
Naharai from Beeroth, the armor bearer of Joab son of Zeruiah;
38
Ira from Jattir;
Gareb from Jattir;
39
Uriah the Hittite.

There were thirty-seven in all.

In this passage, we see that David’s legacy is not the mistakes he made. David’s legacy will be the love that he had for the Lord and the organization that he left behind that served Israel as a whole nation for another 40 years after his death. He left behind disciples that loved him dearly and carried on the quest for excellence that David instilled in them and the love of God that David taught them and lived out in front of them. Sure, David was flawed and sometimes just morally out of bounds completely but that’s not the legacy that we remember. We remember the love of God. We remember the strong nation that he built and handed over to his son, Solomon.

That’s the legacy that my dad will leave behind – my brother an me. We will carry on the family business of ministry in his honor. We will carry on his insatiable thirst for knowledge about God and theology. We will carry on his desire for excellence in what you do. We will carry on his love for Jesus Christ that he lived out in front of us.

What legacy will you leave your children?

Amen and Amen.

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Ruth 4:13-22
The Descendants of Boaz

An Open Letter to My Granddaughter, Ralyn,

Yesterday, I wrote about looking back at my life and being ashamed of the life I lived before I met Jesus Christ. Today, I want to write about my future. You are a big part of my future. You are only 15 ½ months old now, but time will fly and you will become a young lady long before your dad and your granddad are ready for it. I wonder what you will be interested in. What will be your hobbies? What will be your passions? Will you excel at school or will you have to work hard at it? Will you be Poppy’s little buddy? Will I be your confidant for those things that you don’t want to tell your mom and your dad? What will your reputation be as you grow up? Will you be a girl that people can count on? Will your parents be able to count on you doing the right thing? Will I have had any influence on your life at all?

Oh, you are so terribly cute right now. You slay my heart every time I see you. I love you from the depths of my soul and I have only known you a little more than a year. I hope that you and I will be as “thick as thieves” as you grow up. I hope that you will look forward to coming to Papa and Mimi’s house. I hope that you and I will play tricks on Mimi and then just laugh and laugh. I hope that you when you get tired come crawl up in Papa’s lap and snuggle up to my neck. I hope that we can go for long walks in here in The Village and talk about anything and everything. I hope that we can spend time reading books on the front porch. I hope that I can show you important things like “righty tighty, lefty loosey”. I hope that I can teach you how to cut grass. I hope that I can teach you how to trim shrubs. I hope there will be a day when I am cutting grass that you are right behind me with your toy lawnmower following Papa’s every move. I hope that I will be there at your first kindergarten thanksgiving play. I hope that I will be there for the sport that you choose to play and be there at as many games as I can. I hope that my refrigerator will be full of your art masterpieces. I hope that you will ask Papa millions of questions about everything. I hope that I will be there when you want to talk about boys. I hope that I will be there for those conversations about your first kiss. I want to be there to hear about your first school dance. I want to hear about the first boy you decide to call your boyfriend. I want to be there for you when you get your heart broken by that very same boy. I want to be there all along the way. I don’t want to be some stranger to you when you get to be a teenager. I want to still be your confidant then too. I want to hear about that boy that you are madly in love with. I want to hear about that girl who said some unsavory things about you and how you are going to handle that. I want to hear about the high school drama – and I am not talking about the drama department. Who said what to who and who was with who when he was supposed to be with this other girl. I want to help you understand a tough subject in high school. I want to help when you have a tough decision to make – to go with the crowd or do the right thing. I want to be part of your life when you are deciding on what college to go to (subliminal message—go to Clemson, go to Clemson, go to Clemson). I want to be there when you graduate high school. I want to be there when you go off to college (subliminal message—Clemson). I want to be there when you are deciding on what to major in. I want to be there for those talks about the future. I want to be there for those conversations about your career. I want to be there when a professor just introduced a concept that rocked your world and help you process that. I want to be there when you just need to get away from college for a day and we can go for one of our walks like when you were little. I want to be there when you get engaged. I want to be there when you graduate college. I want to be there when you get married.

I may not be around for much after you get married as I will probably be in my 80s by then but one thing in all this stuff is that I want you to know that you were loved so much by your Papa! I want you to know that I had your back while I was here. I want you think about your Papa and it bring a smile to your face no matter how old you get. And most of all, I want to impart a legacy to you about being a Christ follower. I want to be your example of what a true Christ follower looks like. I want to be there to influence you and talk you about sin and salvation. I want to be there when you accept Christ as your Savior. I want to be there and celebrate that. I want to be there for your post-salvation baptism where you proclaim to the world outwardly what has already happened inside your heart and soul. I want that to be my greatest legacy to have passed on Jesus Christ to you.

I Love You More Today than Yesterday,

Papa

That’s what I thought of this morning as I read through this final passage of the book of Ruth. I thought about legacy as I read through Ruth 4:13-22. What will be my legacy after I am gone? Here in this final passage, we know of the legacy of Ruth and Boaz and the role they not only played in their lifetimes but also the legacy that they passed on. Let’s think about that as we read:

13 So Boaz took Ruth into his home, and she became his wife. When he slept with her, the Lord enabled her to become pregnant, and she gave birth to a son. 14 Then the women of the town said to Naomi, “Praise the Lord, who has now provided a redeemer for your family! May this child be famous in Israel. 15 May he restore your youth and care for you in your old age. For he is the son of your daughter-in-law who loves you and has been better to you than seven sons!”

16 Naomi took the baby and cuddled him to her breast. And she cared for him as if he were her own. 17 The neighbor women said, “Now at last Naomi has a son again!” And they named him Obed. He became the father of Jesse and the grandfather of David.

18 This is the genealogical record of their ancestor Perez:

Perez was the father of Hezron.
19
Hezron was the father of Ram.
Ram was the father of Amminadab.
20
Amminadab was the father of Nahshon.
Nahshon was the father of Salmon.[a]
21
Salmon was the father of Boaz.
Boaz was the father of Obed.
22
Obed was the father of Jesse.
Jesse was the father of David.

In this passage and in this book, we see that some might think of the book of Ruth as a nice story about a girl who was fortunate. However, in reality, the events recorded in Ruth were part of God’s preparation for the births of King David and of Jesus Christ, the Messiah. Just as Ruth was unaware of this larger purpose in her life, we will not know the full purpose and importance of our lives until we are able to look back from the heavenly side of eternity. We must make our choices with God’s eternal values in mind. Taking moral shortcuts and living for short-range pleasures are not living life with eternity in mind. Because of Ruth’s faithful obedience, her life and legacy were significant even though she may have not been able to see the results of it in her lifetime. We must live like Ruth. We must live in faithfulness to God, knowing that the significance of your life will extend beyond your lifetime.

So, my most important remaining job in life is to be Papa to my sweet little Ralyn. This will be the most important job I have left to do. I must impart wisdom and knowledge and common sense and love and understanding and advice and most of all be an influence toward my granddaughter coming to know Jesus Christ as her Savior and Lord when she is ready for it. May that be the greatest legacy I leave behind. May that be the final important thing that I do. May that, then, be the lasting legacy. That Ralyn’s mom, my daughter, is a Christ follower, that Ralyn will be, and Ralyn’s daughter and Ralyn’s granddaughter…May that be the legacy.

Amen and Amen.

Joshua 13:15-23

The Land Given to the Tribe of Reuben

Do you ever think about the legacy that you will leave behind? Do think about how your actions will have ripple effects in your family for generations. But are we not forgiven for our past mistakes by God when we accept Christ as our Savior and Lord.

 

This issue has been on my mind lately because of current events locally. I have had to attend the funerals of the father of a friend and the husband of a church member within the last several weeks. And then there has been an issue of a person that was not a close friend but more than a mere acquaintance that has been accused of crimes regarding dissemination of pornography among people who are less than 18 years old. In all of these things, it had me considering the issue of legacy and its relationship to forgiveness in Christ.

 

In the funerals, I heard stories of great legacy. These two men were honored and revered by their families. You can usually tell at funerals whether people are struggling to say nice things about the deceased or whether they are being sincere. In both cases, those who spoke of the deceased were joyously and sometimes tearfully speaking of the things that they respected about the man, the father, the husband, the employee, etc. that these men were. “He was a good man!” was often said at each of these funerals. These were God-fearing men. These were men who led their families well. These were men of quiet generosity not just at church but in the community with those that needed help. These were men that knew what his sons needed in their father in one case or was perfectly suited to be the father of all daughters in the other case. Respect. Honor. Dignity. Generosity. Christ-following. Humble. Hard Working. Integrity. All of these adjectives were lauded upon these men. I am sure that each had their faults and had their screw ups with their kids and their wives but nothing profound that permanently damaged their overall legacy. Their legacy was one of respect and honor. They were able to pass on that legacy to their children. Each of them appear to people of honor and respect and all of that they are they credit to the leadership of their father. Now, that’s legacy my friends. These men were not internationally famous, nationally famous, famous in our state, regionally famous, and probably were not well-known even in our community outside their sphere of influence of church, work, and friends. But the legacy that they have passed down to their progeny is one that I certainly want to have said of me.

 

What will my children and my wife think of me when they have to write my eulogy after I am gone. What legacy am I leaving to him by my actions during my life? What will they say of me? And how will the actions, mistakes, victories, character, how I acted in crunch moments, how far down the genealogical tree will my actions of my lifetime reverberate and shake the branches of my progeny.

 

That same question of legacy and the impact of our actions is what I thought about in the situation where a person I know stands accused of a crime and the evidence is pretty heavy that he did it (but we will reserve the right here to say that he is innocent until proven guilty in a court of law not in the court of public opinion). If he is found guilty of the crime of which he stands accused, what will be the impact of his actions on his family and future generations of his family. What impact will this moment in time have on the generations of his family to come. What will be the legacy of these actions? Sure, we are praying for the redemption of this man from his active and ongoing sin of which he stands accused. We pray that he will be repentant and seek restoration. However, we cannot pray that the consequences of his be removed his life. There are simply some immutable facts of life. Sin has its consequences. We must deal with our sins even after salvation. Sins that we commit before our salvation in the Lord will still visit us in their consequences even after salvation. Just because we accept Christ as our Savior does not mean that we are automatically at that moment absolved of the consequences of our prior sins. God allows those things to play themselves out in our lives as lessons to us as to (1) why we needed Jesus in the first place and (2) as reminders of what sin does to our lives. What will be the far ranging impacts on this man’s life that will be felt for years and decades to come. It will follow him for the rest of his career. He will have to change careers. His earnings potential will be severely impacted by the choices that will be made. These things will happen and cannot be changed. We pray that he will repent, be redeemed from his sin, and be restored to the body of Christ, but his legacy has been impacted. His own life has been impacted. Sin is more than just the moment. It has trailing effects on our lives and the lives of the people we love.

 

My own situation right now in life is impacted by critical path decisions that I have made in my life. These decisions permanently alter the path that your life is on. These decisions effect your legacy. These decisions affect how your children perceive life because of the choices that we make as parents. Legacy. What’s your legacy going to be? We can say that what we do right now does not reverberate down the generations but we are just kidding ourselves. Our sins will visit us upon the next generations after us. Sin has it consequences. We must think about that when we are considering doing things that are in contrast to what the Bible tells us. We must think about the impact it will have not just on us but on the people we love and the generations after us. Because, even though we might be redeemed from our sins through humble repentance before the Lord and receiving His forgiveness through Jesus Christ, our sins’ consequences will play themselves out in our lives. Reduced influence. Temporary setbacks. Lost potential. You name it. Sin has its reverberating and sometimes continuing effects on our lives and those who come after us.

 

That idea of legacy is what I thought of when I read about the land given to the tribe of Reuben. Reuben’s clan was given desert land, basically. That is the lasting impact of the legacy of Reuben himself. It got me to thinking about what was said at these funerals about these two men’s legacy and about the man who stands accused that I know. What is his legacy going to be? And then looking inwardly at myself, what is going to be my legacy? Let’s read the passage, now, Joshua 13:15-23:

 

15 This is what Moses had given to the tribe of Reuben, according to its clans:

 

16 The territory from Aroer on the rim of the Arnon Gorge, and from the town in the middle of the gorge, and the whole plateau past Medeba 17 to Heshbon and all its towns on the plateau, including Dibon, Bamoth Baal, Beth Baal Meon, 18 Jahaz, Kedemoth, Mephaath, 19 Kiriathaim, Sibmah, Zereth Shahar on the hill in the valley, 20 Beth Peor, the slopes of Pisgah, and Beth Jeshimoth— 21 all the towns on the plateau and the entire realm of Sihon king of the Amorites, who ruled at Heshbon. Moses had defeated him and the Midianite chiefs, Evi, Rekem, Zur, Hur and Reba—princes allied with Sihon—who lived in that country. 22 In addition to those slain in battle, the Israelites had put to the sword Balaam son of Beor, who practiced divination. 23 The boundary of the Reubenites was the bank of the Jordan. These towns and their villages were the inheritance of the Reubenites, according to their clans.

 

In Genesis 49:3-4, we read, “Reuben, you are my firstborn, my might, the first sign of my strength, excelling in honor, excelling in power. Turbulent as the waters, you will no longer excel, for you went up onto your father’s bed, onto my couch and defiled it.” Reuben, the firstborn of the twelve sons, was to Jacob his “might, the first sign of my strength” (Genesis 49:3), indicating that to him were all the rights and prerogatives of a firstborn son. At first, he excelled in honor and power, as is fitting the firstborn son, but Jacob declares that Reuben “will no longer excel” (verse 4) due to his sin of incest with Bilhah, his father’s concubine wife (Genesis 35:22). Although that sin was committed forty years prior, there was left an indelible spot on Reuben’s character and that of his posterity. By committing this uncleanness with his father’s wife, there would be reproach upon his tribe and the family, to whom he ought to have been an example and a blessing. He forfeited the prerogatives of the birthright, and his dying father demoted him, although he did not disown or disinherit him. He would still have all the privileges of a son, but not of the firstborn.

 

Jacob’s sad prophecy for Reuben certainly came true. No judge, prophet, ruler, or prince came from that tribe, nor any person of renown except Dathan and Abiram, who were noted for their rebellion against Moses. Reuben’s tribe chose a settlement on the other side Jordan, a further indication of the loss of godly influence on his brothers to which his birthright entitled him. Although Reuben was the firstborn, the kingdom was given to Judah and the priesthood to Levi, leaving Reuben’s tribe to be small and non-influential.

 

We learn from Reuben that those who dabble in sin must not expect to save their reputation or maintain a positive influence upon others. Although we know our sins were nailed to the cross and we are forever forgiven for past sins, we still have to suffer the consequences of those sins, which include remorse and a loss of reputation and influence. Reuben’s sin left an indelible mark upon him and his family. As Christians, we must understand that dishonor is a wound that will not be healed without a scar. We can been redeemed from our sin and be healed from it but our sins will leave scars on us.

 

What is your legacy going to be? What sins are you committing right now that you are justifying as OK that you don’t want to give up and you are reveling in going to do to your legacy? What are our unrepentant sins going to do to us in this lifetime and what effects are they going to have on our families and the future generations? Is that sin worth all the cost? Repent. Turn away. Wash your hands of it. Seek forgiveness from God. Seek restoration through forgiveness. What’s your legacy going to be?

 

Amen and Amen.