Archive for the ‘13-1 Chronicles’ Category

1 Chronicles 14:8-17 (Part 2 of 2)

David Conquers the Philistines

There is a saying that you hear sometimes about those who claim to be Christian but maybe actually are not. It says they “sit in church on Sundays, but live like hell the rest of the week!” These are the people that maybe Billy Graham was talking about when he said that the vast majority “of people sitting in church on Sunday are not saved.” These are the people that live with one foot in the world and one foot in Christ. These are the ones that rationalize away a sin as sin because it is their sin and they don’t want to give it up. They have not changed a thing about their lives. They still hang out and all the same haunts. They still do all the same stuff they used to do. They still actively participate in sins that satisfy their fleshly desires. They simply go to church on Sundays as a way to make up for all the stuff they have done during the past week. There has been no life change. There is no revulsion toward the things that are not of God. There is no desire to please the Lord. There is only negotiation and rationalization as to why there is a special deal between you and God for the behaviors that you dabble in that are clearly against the Word of God. There is no about face in their lives. They just added the olive of going to church to the martini of their lives.

As well, for us as Christ followers, who have truly given their lives to the Lord, when we allow ourselves to be surrounded by sin, we will struggle not to be a part of it. When we accept Christ as our Savior, it does not give us some Teflon coating when it comes to sin. We must stele ourselves against sin, particularly those that we are most vulnerable to. There are sins that we can easily walk away from as part of our life change through the Holy Spirit. However, as we talked about yesterday, there are those sins or classes of sins that are like kryptonite for us. We are powerless against them. Every time we find them in our path, we pick them up. Every time, we are near them, we succumb to them – EVERY TIME.

In each of these cases, we must seek to please the Lord from a heart that really has changed. We must submit ourselves to the lordship of Jesus Christ. We must listen to the Holy Spirit. We must destroy the idols in our lives. We cannot negotiate with sin. It will win every time, particularly those sins that we seem to enjoy the most, those that we just can’t seem to shake, those that are our pet sins, our kryptonite sins. We must burn the idols in our lives. We must not go near the sins that we know are our weak spots. We may have to change the sandboxes that we sit down and play in. We may have to change the playmates we play with.

With that idea in mind, let’s read this passage, 1 Chronicles 14:8-17, now:

8 When the Philistines heard that David had been anointed king over all Israel, they mobilized all their forces to capture him. But David was told they were coming, so he marched out to meet them. 9 The Philistines arrived and made a raid in the valley of Rephaim. 10 So David asked God, “Should I go out to fight the Philistines? Will you hand them over to me?”

The Lord replied, “Yes, go ahead. I will hand them over to you.”

11 So David and his troops went up to Baal-perazim and defeated the Philistines there. “God did it!” David exclaimed. “He used me to burst through my enemies like a raging flood!” So they named that place Baal-perazim (which means “the Lord who bursts through”). 12 The Philistines had abandoned their gods there, so David gave orders to burn them.

13 But after a while the Philistines returned and raided the valley again. 14 And once again David asked God what to do. “Do not attack them straight on,” God replied. “Instead, circle around behind and attack them near the poplar[a] trees. 15 When you hear a sound like marching feet in the tops of the poplar trees, go out and attack! That will be the signal that God is moving ahead of you to strike down the Philistine army.” 16 So David did what God commanded, and they struck down the Philistine army all the way from Gibeon to Gezer.

17 So David’s fame spread everywhere, and the Lord caused all the nations to fear David.

In this passage, we see that David’s quick and decisive action against idols helped unify his kingdom and focus the people on worshiping the one true God. He was obeying the law that said, “You must break down their pagan altars and shatter their sacred pillars. Cut down their Asherah poles and burn their idols (see Deuteronomy 7:5). Often, the soldiers wanted to keep souvenirs from their battles., but David ordered them to burn the idols. The only proper response to sin is to get rid of it completely. You cannot be a follower of the Lord, while continuing to hold on to parts of your life where God is not the center of your thoughts and actions. Eliminate whatever takes God’s rightful place in your life and follow Him with complete devotion.

We cannot play games and rationalize away anything that gets in the way of our relationship with God. Anything that gets in the way is an idol. It can be a person that you worship. You may not bow down before this person in a formal worship act but your actions indicate it. It can be a thing that you worship. It can be a job. It can be an activity. It can be a hobby. It can be an addiction. Anything that consumes your thoughts that is not of God is an Asherah pole in your life, an idol that you worship – instead of God. We must burn the idols in our lives instead of allowing them to exist in our lives. Burn it down to the ground. Listen to the Holy Spirit’s leading about the things in your life that you worship before God. Remove them. Burn them down!

Amen and Amen.

1 Chronicles 14:8-17 (Part 1 of 2)

David Conquers the Philistines

Have you ever noticed sometimes with your kids, whether adult or teenage, that they really don’t want to have anything to do with you – until they need something. Maybe, you have one child like that. Maybe, all of your children are like that. I have had some experience in the area over the past decade with my youngest child. She disappears from my life for months at a time, sometimes for a year or more. Then, suddenly, she reappears in my life and wants to spend time with me. Because of my experience with her in this way over the past decade, when she calls for the first time in a while and wants to see me, then, my natural first reaction is, “what does she want?” or “what kind of jam is she in that she needs my financial help to get out of?” I reach for my wallet, so to speak, when she calls. I know it’s going to cost me something. I hate that being my first, natural response when she calls out of the blue for the first time in months. I wish I did not feel that way. But experience, time and again, has proven that this response is the one most often required.

It does not have to be your kids. You may have friends that only show up in your life when you can do something for them and then they disappear. We all know friends like this. And, I fear that sometimes, we all are like that with God sometimes. But David…David was different. He was by no means a perfect guy. All the times that he screwed up, it was when he did not consult God before he had to choose a course of action. However, in most cases, David always consulted God before making any of his military or administrative decisions. In contrast, though, most of us only consult God when we have made a mess of things. Let’s read this passage and see how David goes to God before each action in this passage, 1 Chronicles 14:8-17:

8 When the Philistines heard that David had been anointed king over all Israel, they mobilized all their forces to capture him. But David was told they were coming, so he marched out to meet them. 9 The Philistines arrived and made a raid in the valley of Rephaim. 10 So David asked God, “Should I go out to fight the Philistines? Will you hand them over to me?”

The Lord replied, “Yes, go ahead. I will hand them over to you.”

11 So David and his troops went up to Baal-perazim and defeated the Philistines there. “God did it!” David exclaimed. “He used me to burst through my enemies like a raging flood!” So they named that place Baal-perazim (which means “the Lord who bursts through”). 12 The Philistines had abandoned their gods there, so David gave orders to burn them.

13 But after a while the Philistines returned and raided the valley again. 14 And once again David asked God what to do. “Do not attack them straight on,” God replied. “Instead, circle around behind and attack them near the poplar[a] trees. 15 When you hear a sound like marching feet in the tops of the poplar trees, go out and attack! That will be the signal that God is moving ahead of you to strike down the Philistine army.” 16 So David did what God commanded, and they struck down the Philistine army all the way from Gibeon to Gezer.

17 So David’s fame spread everywhere, and the Lord caused all the nations to fear David.

In this passage, we see that, before David went to battle, he inquired of God first. He sought what God wanted him to do (not demanding that God support what he was planning). He asks for God’s guidance and presence. Too often, we wait until we are in trouble before turning to God. By then, the consequences of our actions are already unfolding and are irreversible. Do you ask for God’s help only as a desperate last resort? Instead, we should go to Him first, before we take any action, particularly on important actions that could have deep impact on our lives and the lives of others. Like David, we may receive incredible insight and help from God so that we can avoid serious pitfalls that could cause us to crash and burn, so to speak. Often, God will respond with a thought of the course of action needed that comes to your mind that you had not thought of before. Other times, this guidance comes through people that we trust. He influences them to speak truth to us about what we need to do before we do it.

Are you using God as the God of last resort? Or do you cultivate a loving and daily relationship with God? Do you wait until you have no other place to turn to come to God? Or do you seek God’s guidance before you make decisions? Some of us make the mistake of trying to run our own lives 95% of the time and then when things turn sour in those 5% times, we are all up into prayer to God. God will not fix the effects of our own causes. He developed the universe based on the laws of cause and effect. So, He will let the circumstances of our lives to play themselves out. That’s when many of us get mad at God – when He doesn’t magically end the unfolding chain of events that were caused by our actions – in which we did not consult Him beforehand.

That’s the thing that I love about David in this passage. He is wise enough to know that He does not know it all. He is wise enough to know that God does! He is wise enough to go to God before He has to make a decision, particularly ones where it’s not just him but the lives of His soldiers are involved too. He wants to make God-ordained decisions. Why can’t we be like that? Let’s be like that. Let’s make God our God every day and every minute and not just a God of last resort!

Amen and Amen.

1 Chronicles 14:1-7 (Part 2 of 2)

David’s Palace and Family

We all have those, what I call, our kryptonite sins. I call them our kryptonite sins because we all have those areas in life where no matter how hard we try – when we get in the same neighborhood of a particular kind of sin, we always succumb to its siren song. It disables our good judgment. It causes us to throw away years of spiritual maturation. It’s like kryptonite to Superman. Kryptonite disabled all of Superman’s earthly super-powers. Our kryptonite sins are the ones that disable all our spirit-filled defenses against sin. These are the sins that overpower us.

For David, his kryptonite sin was sexual conquest. He loved women and what only women can give a man. It was his kryptonite sin area. David was awed by beautiful women. As you can tell, by the number of children that he had, he reallllly liked women. The episode with Bathsheba shows us that David allowed his sexual desire to override his good sense. This is the same man who has been given the nickname of being “a man after God’s own heart”! In addition, his sinful desire for Bathsheba caused him to commit the sin of complicity to murder. He directed the murder of Bathsheba’s husband. He may not have physically murdered the man but he may as well have. His sin weakness led to a host of other moral failures just so he could keep his pet sin (sexual desire) hidden.

We read about David’s episode with Bathsheba, but that’s not the only wife he had and then add up all the concubines, the dude had sexual desire issues. We all have our kryptonite sin areas. For some, it’s like David – sexual desire overrules all our good sense. For others, it is alcohol abuse. For others, drugs will bring us down every time. For others, it’s money. For others, it’s gossip. For others, it’s (fill in the blank) _____________. Each one of us has that sin area that no matter how hard we say we will not fall to that temptation again, we do it every single time, we get near that type of temptation.

With that in mind, let’s read this passage, 1 Chronicles 14:1-7. Seeing the comment about “more wives” and “more children” that he had by these wives, reminds us that David had a specific sin weakness nearly cost him everything:

Chapter 14

1 Then King Hiram of Tyre sent messengers to David, along with cedar timber, and stonemasons and carpenters to build him a palace. 2 And David realized that the Lord had confirmed him as king over Israel and had greatly blessed his kingdom for the sake of his people Israel.

3 Then David married more wives in Jerusalem, and they had more sons and daughters. 4 These are the names of David’s sons who were born in Jerusalem: Shammua, Shobab, Nathan, Solomon, 5 Ibhar, Elishua, Elpelet, 6 Nogah, Nepheg, Japhia, 7 Elishama, Eliada,[a] and Eliphelet.

In this passage, we see that David accumulated wives and concubines. Having a harem of women was the custom of the day among royals of Middle Eastern culture. However, it was not of God’s design (see Genesis 2:24). David’s marriages brought him great power and influence (because many of his wives, he married to create political alliances with other countries and so on). At the same time, though, the many wives and the children by multiple mothers was a constant cause of strife within David’s royal family. It was his family that caused him the most strife in his life. It was his family that almost cost him his kingdom.

What is your sin weakness? What is your kryptonite sin? What sin is it that you always succumb to the temptation of that sin…without fail? That’s the challenge for us is that usually our kryptonite sins are the ones that we refuse to see as sins to begin with. We refuse to see that we need help with them. We refuse to ask for help with them (because we secretly want to have no one to block us from them if push comes to shove). We must be honest with ourselves about those particular sins that suck us into the drain each and every time we get near them. We all have that one kind of sin! Don’t kid yourself…you do!

Lord, help us to find a true friend that will hold us accountable for our kryptonite sins and help us to avoid being even in the same zip code with that kind of sin! Lord, help us to be honest enough to share this with a trusted friend. Lord, most of us, help us to be honest with you and ask for your help with these particularly stubborn sins for us. Help us to shed ourselves of them through your power before we let them destroy us.

Amen and Amen.

1 Chronicles 14:1-7 (Part 1 of 2)

David’s Palace and Family

In this time of national crisis where we are in the midst of a social and economic shutdown because of the Coronavirus, we are reminded both of the best of humankind and the worst of humankind. In the negative, we see people hoarding goods such as toilet paper, disinfectant, hand sanitizer, soaps and other such goods that are deemed important. They buy as much as they can without thinking of anyone else. It has gotten to the point that you see stores limited the quantities of these products that one family can purchase on a single visit to the store. These rules had to be implemented by grocery stores and other retailers who sell these products to prevent this all-out brand of selfishness by a lot of people. It is not just some isolated thing. You see it from a lot of people all over the country, regardless of region, regardless of size of the local population, regardless of whether they are Christian or non-believers. It is just shameful to see people act in such an overtly selfish manner.

On the other hand, we have seen instances where people are being extraordinarily kind to one another. We see church members checking on each other by phone. We see church members who are bringing food to elderly folks in their churches who are shut-ins. We see churches whose ladies are sewing cloth surgical masks to help ease the short supply of these items. We see people bringing meals to hospital workers. We see neighborhoods creating food banks on the corners of key streets in their neighborhoods so that they can share goods that others might need, such as paper towels, canned goods, sanitary wipes, and so on. We see restaurants who use to not deliver to their customers that are now doing so. We see these acts of good at the same time we have seen the bad.

It is a reminder to us of what this passage is about. David remembered what his blessings were for. It was for his people, not just for him. With that in mind, let’s read this passage, 1 Chronicles 14:1-7, now:

Chapter 14

1 Then King Hiram of Tyre sent messengers to David, along with cedar timber, and stonemasons and carpenters to build him a palace. 2 And David realized that the Lord had confirmed him as king over Israel and had greatly blessed his kingdom for the sake of his people Israel.

3 Then David married more wives in Jerusalem, and they had more sons and daughters. 4 These are the names of David’s sons who were born in Jerusalem: Shammua, Shobab, Nathan, Solomon, 5 Ibhar, Elishua, Elpelet, 6 Nogah, Nepheg, Japhia, 7 Elishama, Eliada,[a] and Eliphelet.

In this passage, we see that God gave David honor and success, but not simply for David’s personal gain. David, as the passage notes, realized that God had prospered him for a special reason – for the sake of God’s people. This passage reminds us today that we can be often tempted to use our possessions simply for our own good. Instead, we must remember that our blessings are from God. He has blessed us with where we are, what we are given, all of it should be used to encourage others and be support to those who are in need. We must glorify God with the blessings that He has bestowed upon us.

We must always remember that whatever we have is given to us by God. He gave us the talents to earn money. He gives us the intelligence to do what we do. He gives us the expertise to do what pays us money. Let us remember that we are simply stewards of what God has given us. As a result, we must be a generous people who sees that everything is not about us. We must be generous with the wealth that our God-given talents have allowed us to acquire. We should not store up treasures for ourselves. We must give God glory by using our resources to, yes, take care of our family but also to make sure that others are taken care of who are in need. Help us to not hoard our wealth to ourselves and think of it all as a result of our own power. Help us to see that it all comes from you God so that we loosen our grip on the desire to hoard, to store up, to acquire only for the betterment of ourselves.

Give us generous hearts oh Lord. Help us to see that you were generous to us through what You did for us through Jesus on the cross and through His resurrection. Let us take this time to realize that it all comes from you and you desire us as Christ followers to be blessings to the world around us.

Amen and Amen.

1 Chronicles 13:1-14 (Part 6 of 6)

David Attempts to Move the Ark

Today, in my blog for our church member’s consumption at our church’s Facebook page while we are in shutdown mode (due to the Coronavirus scare), I talked about my dad. One of the things that I wrote about was that Dad had his rules for behavior for us as his sons, his children. One of his famous sayings (and my dad had plenty of them seeing as how he grew up in the rural South on a farm) was “as long as you put your feet under my table, you will do as I say!” Translated for the non-Southerner, that means as long as you live in my house, wear the clothes I buy for you and eat your meals at my dinner table, you owe me your obedience. My dad was a loving dad. He was the kind of guy that expected a lot out of us but at the same time, he would play ball with us and just do stuff with us for fun. It was a well-rounded view that I got of my dad. He had expectations of behavior from us but yet at the same time he would show us love through his pride in us in a job well done, in achieving some milestone, and just a hug when we needed it.

That’s the thing that we get confused about sometimes with God. People often talk about they like the New Testament God better than the Old Testament God, as if He was two different Gods. When you press people on it, they see the New Testament God as a God of love whereas they see the Old Testament God as a spiteful, vengeful God. They see God in the New Testament as a cuddly kitten whereas they see the God of the Old Testament as this smiting pitbull of a God. They often point to this passage (and its similar passage at 2 Samuel 6:6-7) as evidence of a spiteful, mean-spirited God. They say that Uzzah was only trying to protect the Ark. That raises the question of … is there a difference between God of the Old Testament and the God of the New Testament. Are they not different aspects of the same God just like my dad who was equal parts high expectations and love?

With that idea of the exploring why God would zap Uzzah but yet be the same God that loves us so much that He died on the cross for us, let’s explore that aspect of this scene in 1 Chronicles 13:1-14 after we read it now:

3 David consulted with all his officials, including the generals and captains of his army.[a] 2 Then he addressed the entire assembly of Israel as follows: “If you approve and if it is the will of the Lord our God, let us send messages to all the Israelites throughout the land, including the priests and Levites in their towns and pasturelands. Let us invite them to come and join us. 3 It is time to bring back the Ark of our God, for we neglected it during the reign of Saul.”

4 The whole assembly agreed to this, for the people could see it was the right thing to do. 5 So David summoned all Israel, from the Shihor Brook of Egypt in the south all the way to the town of Lebo-hamath in the north, to join in bringing the Ark of God from Kiriath-jearim. 6 Then David and all Israel went to Baalah of Judah (also called Kiriath-jearim) to bring back the Ark of God, which bears the name[b] of the Lord who is enthroned between the cherubim. 7 They placed the Ark of God on a new cart and brought it from Abinadab’s house. Uzzah and Ahio were guiding the cart. 8 David and all Israel were celebrating before God with all their might, singing songs and playing all kinds of musical instruments—lyres, harps, tambourines, cymbals, and trumpets.

9 But when they arrived at the threshing floor of Nacon,[c] the oxen stumbled, and Uzzah reached out his hand to steady the Ark. 10 Then the Lord’s anger was aroused against Uzzah, and he struck him dead because he had laid his hand on the Ark. So Uzzah died there in the presence of God.

11 David was angry because the Lord’s anger had burst out against Uzzah. He named that place Perez-uzzah (which means “to burst out against Uzzah”), as it is still called today.

12 David was now afraid of God, and he asked, “How can I ever bring the Ark of God back into my care?” 13 So David did not move the Ark into the City of David. Instead, he took it to the house of Obed-edom of Gath. 14 The Ark of God remained there in Obed-edom’s house for three months, and the Lord blessed the household of Obed-edom and everything he owned.

In this passage, we see that Uzzah died instantly for touching the Ark, but God blessed Obed-edom’s home while it was stored there. This passage demonstrates two of the attributes of God’s character. He is, at the same time, perfectly just and perfectly loving. Great blessings come to those who obey His commands, but punishment comes to those who disobey Him. This punishment may come swiftly and with immediacy, or it may come over time, but it will come. Sometimes, we focus only on God’s loving aspect of his attributes while forgetting that when we sin that God is a God of justice and cannot let disobedience go unnoticed. At other times, we concentrate on all of God’s “smiting” that we miss His blessings to those who obey Him. We cannot fall into a one-sided view of God based on a single aspect of His attributes. Along with God’s blessings comes the responsibility to continue to offer God our obedience to His commands. We must embrace His demands for fairness, honesty, and justice as much as we do His loving kindness and forgiveness.

In this passage, it is a difficult one if you simply look at it in isolation and not in the larger light of all of Scripture. Here, you see this earnest guy named Uzzah who was simply trying to keep the Ark from touching the ground and falling over on its side. For that, you would think Uzzah would get some props for extending himself beyond the call of duty by God. Right? However, we have to look at this passage in the context of the larger story of Scripture.

In Numbers 4:5-15, the Ark was to be only by the Levites, who were to carry it using special carrying poles – they were never to touch the Ark itself. To touch it would result in the death of whomever did it. God allowed His presence to be manifest in and around the Ark. Therefore, with His presence manifesting itself in and around the Ark, it was perfect and holy not because of the Ark itself but because of God. On this side of eternity, nothing imperfect and unholy can be in the presence of God without being consumed by His perfection and holiness. As people of a sinful nature inherited from generation to generation and then us being sinners in and of ourselves (we commit sins daily on our own not to mention we inherit unholiness all the way back to Adam and Eve), we cannot exist in the presence of God in and of our own merit. Therefore, God made specific provisions for the handling of the Ark so that His chosen people would be able to have the Ark near them. David placed the Ark on a cart and followed the Philistine pagan example of handling the Ark rather than God’s commands. Uzzah, though sincere in his desire to protect the Ark, had to face the consequences of the sin of directly touching the Ark – imperfection being consumed by the perfection of God.

How do we reconcile that with a forgiving God that we love to dwell on as we read the New Testament? God is the same God in both places. We must remember that and see that. Here are some examples of God being a God of justice in the New Testament:

The New Testament also has many examples of God as Judge:

  • The Jews for the rejection of Christ (Matthew 21:43-44, 1 Thessalonians 2:14-16)
  • Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1-10)
  • Herod (Acts 12:21-23)
  • The church at Corinth (1 Corinthians 11:29-32)

As well, Paul writes of God’s coming justice for each us in his letters to the churches. For example, Paul says, “For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, that each one may receive what is due him for the things done while in the body, whether good or bad” (2 Corinthians 5:10). He also says, “Now there is in store for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will award to me on that day—and not only to me, but also to all who have longed for his appearing” (2 Timothy 4:8). Further, “Do not take revenge, my friends, but leave room for God’s wrath, for it is written: ‘It is mine to avenge; I will repay,’ says the Lord” (Romans 12:19). As well, Paul says, “This will take place on the day when God judges people’s secrets through Jesus Christ, as my gospel declares” (Romans 2:16). Additionally, other apostles said the same thing. Peter says, “But they will have to give account to him who is ready to judge the living and the dead” (1 Peter 4:5).

How can we not see that there is a theme of God’s justice throughout the Old AND the New Testament. Without the justice of God, His love is meaningless. Without His high standard for our obedience to His commands, His love toward us means so much more. Without His justice, his forgiveness is unnecessary and can be seen as an entitlement rather than a gift. Therefore, let us see God like what our earthly fathers are defined as being like as ideal for us. Our earthly fathers, when they are doing their jobs as fathers in the way that benefits us the most is when they are equal parts:

  • tough guy who has defined and in-concrete boundaries for our behavior who exacts consequences from us for having crossed those boundaries – no negotiations, no whining, just accepting the known consequences of known crossings of the fixed boundaries.
  • fun guy who quietly demonstrates to us that he loves us through playing with us, celebrating with us, praising us, and just those looks of satisfaction and approval he can give us.

So, help us Lord not to focus on a single attribute of God at the expense of your multi-faceted attributes. You are a God of many attributes. You are a God of justice and a God of love.

Amen and Amen.

1 Chronicles 13:1-14 (Part 5 of 6)

David Attempts to Move the Ark

I recently saw a meme on Facebook about what’s going to happen with this current global pandemic has died out. It said something to the effect that there will be an explosion of those things that we cannot do right now. The restaurants will have two hour waits. The baseball stadiums will be sold-out. The beaches will be crowded. People will be hugging everyone they see. And other things to that effect.

That got me to thinking about how we ought to be when we get back to church, whenever we are given the go-ahead to have in-person worship services again. I hope and pray that the reaction will be similar to that which is predicted in the secular world where we can get back to enjoying the entertainments and the social gatherings (and the easy availability of toilet paper! LOL!). I hope that when we get back together as churches, we will be like a black churches when they get their praise on! I hope that we will be overjoyed to be together. I hope that we will be exuberant in our praise of God who has seen us through the dark days of the Coronavirus. I hope that Amens will be a part of our normal worship. I hope that we will be free to raise our hands in praise. I hope that we will be free to come to the altar and pray prayers of thanksgiving for what God has done. I hope that we will be open to new ways of expressing our praise in music and in how we personally show it.

There are times that we should be reflective in worship. There are times where we should be somber. Like right now in the midst of this virus, we should be somber and reflective in how we approach God. We should be crying out to Him to see us through this dark valley. And that is right to worship in this way right now. But when we get out of this thing – and we will because of our great God – we should not let social convention, the type of church we are, the denomination we are, or whatever else that holds us back from exuberantly worshiping the Lord, then, we will be wrong at that time. God wants both from us. Somber reflective worship when the times call for it. But when we have been delivered and set on that high ground, we should not let religious inhibitions cause us to contain our joy at what God has done.

With that idea of showing our joy in worship that we see from David (before the error of how the handling of the Ark caused a death), let’s explore that aspect of this scene in 1 Chronicles 13:1-14 after we read it now:

3 David consulted with all his officials, including the generals and captains of his army.[a] 2 Then he addressed the entire assembly of Israel as follows: “If you approve and if it is the will of the Lord our God, let us send messages to all the Israelites throughout the land, including the priests and Levites in their towns and pasturelands. Let us invite them to come and join us. 3 It is time to bring back the Ark of our God, for we neglected it during the reign of Saul.”

4 The whole assembly agreed to this, for the people could see it was the right thing to do. 5 So David summoned all Israel, from the Shihor Brook of Egypt in the south all the way to the town of Lebo-hamath in the north, to join in bringing the Ark of God from Kiriath-jearim. 6 Then David and all Israel went to Baalah of Judah (also called Kiriath-jearim) to bring back the Ark of God, which bears the name[b] of the Lord who is enthroned between the cherubim. 7 They placed the Ark of God on a new cart and brought it from Abinadab’s house. Uzzah and Ahio were guiding the cart. 8 David and all Israel were celebrating before God with all their might, singing songs and playing all kinds of musical instruments—lyres, harps, tambourines, cymbals, and trumpets.

9 But when they arrived at the threshing floor of Nacon,[c] the oxen stumbled, and Uzzah reached out his hand to steady the Ark. 10 Then the Lord’s anger was aroused against Uzzah, and he struck him dead because he had laid his hand on the Ark. So Uzzah died there in the presence of God.

11 David was angry because the Lord’s anger had burst out against Uzzah. He named that place Perez-uzzah (which means “to burst out against Uzzah”), as it is still called today.

12 David was now afraid of God, and he asked, “How can I ever bring the Ark of God back into my care?” 13 So David did not move the Ark into the City of David. Instead, he took it to the house of Obed-edom of Gath. 14 The Ark of God remained there in Obed-edom’s house for three months, and the Lord blessed the household of Obed-edom and everything he owned.

In this passage, we see that worship in the Old Testament was more than a sober, religious exercise. David’s exuberance as he worshiped God, with dancing and exuberance, is mentioned several times in Scripture, and is thus approved by God. Our worship should reflect a balance of the two. Sometimes, we should be reflective and serious (See Exodus 19:14 and following). Sometimes, we should show enthusiasm and jubilation. David was so awesome that way. He had such a deep relationship with the Lord that He did not care how his praise looked. He simply praised God. He was somber when the situation called for it. But when it was time for all-out praise, David was always all-out in his personal praise. When it was time for all-out praise, David let it all hang out. Can we be that way or will we worry about what others think, when this pandemic is done?

That’s my hope when all this is said and done and things get back to normal. I would love to see my church filled with the people of Lamar that call themselves Methodists to be in our church excited. Let us be a Lamar United Methodist Church that people can hear across the street as we exclaim our joy at what God has done. I want that something good comes from this bad. I want that this church become alive with praise. That church is no longer just something you do on Sunday. That church is something that you can’t wait to get there. That church is where we let our hearts be filled with joy and purpose and that we get energized to reach a community that needs Jesus. That church is our top priority in life. That church is what we arrange our lives around and not the other way around. That we exuberiantly praise Him when we are together and that we have exuberance in sharing the gospel when we are not. That’s the church that I want to emerge from this crisis. A church that has exuberance. A church that can praise like nobody’s watching just like that song about dancing like nobody’s watching. A church with spunk. A church with fire. A church full of praise-filled life!

Amen and Amen.

1 Chronicles 13:1-14 (Part 4 of 6)

David Attempts to Move the Ark

One of the dangers that has worried me as we suffer through the worldwide pandemic of the Coronavirus is what will happen afterwards, particularly in the church – not just mine but all churches. Will we emerge stronger and more hungry? Will we emerge with renewed interest of non-believers in spiritual matters? Will we emerge with no new interest by non-believers and we lose some of the fringe folks that attend our church just because it’s the socially accepted thing? Will the neglect of gathering together as a body of believers of these two Sundays, if not more (and I believe it will be more), cause church to be further weakened in society and even among our own people?

That’s why there are four things that we have to do as the church – not just mine but all churches. First, we must endeavor to stay connected to one another in the fellowship by whatever means possible. If you were supposed to have a women’s small group meeting this week or early next month – figure out ways to create a video and audio link to hold the meeting virtually. Even if you have elderly members of your small groups that cannot handle modern technology and social media, at least get them to call in to the audio number for the virtual small group meeting. That’s just one example of the discipleship meetings that occur throughout the month that could be taken online. We need to stay connected in this way. More intimate settings of small groups need to continue. Further, we need to beef up our other electronic means of communication such as a church app on church member cell phones and improving websites and other social media pages.

Second, we must continue to innovate in the ways that we get our Sunday worship services online and/or before our people. Most of us did Facebook or Youtube Live services this past Sunday. At my own church, I prepared and posted daily devotionals each day during the week that were shorter versions of what I would have preached from the pulpit on March 22nd and this upcoming Sunday on March 29th. On Sundays, March 22nd and March 29th, I did and will upload a 10-minute video message that will summarize the past week’s daily devotions. However, we are quickly approaching two very important dates, Palm Sunday and Easter, on the Christian church calendar if the quarantine is extended beyond the end of March to the end of April.

We must figure out ways to continue to innovate. People will most likely tire of Facebook Live or Youtube Live after this Sunday. We must consider ways to have people physically present but yet still quarantining themselves. One of the things that I have been thinking of (and one of my parishioners talked to me about this too yesterday) for Easter is to have a version of “drive-in theatre” church – where people drive their cars to a parking lot (at church or some other public place), stay in their cars, and we have a sound system set up and such and we just have church right there in the parking lot.

Third, we must as a church and me as a pastor commit to calling and checking on each other by phone or by video chat each day. Parishioners need to make a list of the people within the church and within our community that you come in contact with the most and then check on them periodically and pray with them over the phone or video chat. As a pastor, I have been talking a letter a day from the alphabet and calling all my church members whose last name starts with that letter and call them them. Today, I will be calling all my members whose last names starts with F. Tomorrow will be the G’s and so on.

Fourth, we need to beef up our people management systems in our churches, particularly smaller ones. We were planning to implement a church management software package called ChurchTrac later in this year – sometime in the second half of the year. However, the pandemic has forced us to up the implementation date to NOW. We are working to get it all set up now – the church calendar is set up, the attendance framework is set up, data tagging is complete (so that we can associate a person’s responsibilities and activites at the church with their name), the chart of accounts for the accounting module has been set up, the various rooms for meetings and events have been created for event planning, the online giving system has been set up, and now the names of our members and other regular attenders are being entered into the people database. That’s about 60% done. In the end, we will be able push notifications out to our people, keep them informed, help them track their giving, and to generate our financial reports and other data management activities all within one software package that is all cross-integrated. This will help us to communicate with our people and keep them informed going forward after the pandemic is over as much as it will aid us during.

Why do all this? Well, it’s to keep the church connected to its people. The worse thing that could happen is neglect. If we don’t actively stay in touch with our people, they may ask themselves a question that they may have never asked before – do I really need my church? We want them to answer that question with a resounding yes.

With that idea of preventing neglect of God’s people and God’s Word in mind, let’s explore that aspect of this scene in 1 Chronicles 13:1-14 after we read it now:

3 David consulted with all his officials, including the generals and captains of his army.[a] 2 Then he addressed the entire assembly of Israel as follows: “If you approve and if it is the will of the Lord our God, let us send messages to all the Israelites throughout the land, including the priests and Levites in their towns and pasturelands. Let us invite them to come and join us. 3 It is time to bring back the Ark of our God, for we neglected it during the reign of Saul.”

4 The whole assembly agreed to this, for the people could see it was the right thing to do. 5 So David summoned all Israel, from the Shihor Brook of Egypt in the south all the way to the town of Lebo-hamath in the north, to join in bringing the Ark of God from Kiriath-jearim. 6 Then David and all Israel went to Baalah of Judah (also called Kiriath-jearim) to bring back the Ark of God, which bears the name[b] of the Lord who is enthroned between the cherubim. 7 They placed the Ark of God on a new cart and brought it from Abinadab’s house. Uzzah and Ahio were guiding the cart. 8 David and all Israel were celebrating before God with all their might, singing songs and playing all kinds of musical instruments—lyres, harps, tambourines, cymbals, and trumpets.

9 But when they arrived at the threshing floor of Nacon,[c] the oxen stumbled, and Uzzah reached out his hand to steady the Ark. 10 Then the Lord’s anger was aroused against Uzzah, and he struck him dead because he had laid his hand on the Ark. So Uzzah died there in the presence of God.

11 David was angry because the Lord’s anger had burst out against Uzzah. He named that place Perez-uzzah (which means “to burst out against Uzzah”), as it is still called today.

12 David was now afraid of God, and he asked, “How can I ever bring the Ark of God back into my care?” 13 So David did not move the Ark into the City of David. Instead, he took it to the house of Obed-edom of Gath. 14 The Ark of God remained there in Obed-edom’s house for three months, and the Lord blessed the household of Obed-edom and everything he owned.

In this passage, we see that the Ark of God was the most sacred object of the Jewish faith. It was a large box containing the stone tablets on which God had personally written the Ten Commandments. David had already made Jerusalem his political capital. At this time, David was bringing the Ark there in order to make Jerusalem the nation’s religious capital as well. The Ark of God had been in Kiriath-jearim for many years. The neglect of the Ark symbolized Israel’s neglect of God. Bringing the Ark back to the center of Israel’s life reflected David’s desire to remind the nation of its true foundation – God. Neglecting those things that remind us of God – the Bible, the church and contact with Christians – can cause us to also neglect God.

Oh Father, help us to continue to feed the sheep and keep the sheep from wandering away. Help us to be ready to accept new sheep into the herd when we are done with this pandemic. Help us to emerge as a stronger church and a church that is reaching more people. Help us to turn this bad thing into something useful for the kingdom.

Amen and Amen.