2 Kings 15:23-31 – Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You…

Posted: August 14, 2019 in 12-2 Kings

2 Kings 15:23-31

Pekahiah, Pekah and Hoshea Rule in Israel

Weak borders. Decaying morality. Self-absorbed with their own pleasure. Political infighting. What country does that sound like? Oh you thought it was the United States in the current day, but I was talking about the northern kingdom of Israel in biblical times. But, yeah, it does sound like the United States in the current day, doesn’t it?

Why is that nations that have been prosperous end up decaying themselves from within. It has happened repeatedly throughout history. Just look at the Roman Empire. It was the greatest empire that has ever been known to man. However, the empire became a victim to its own success. They stopped expanding the empire and became obsessed with their own pleasures and material wealth. So much so that they began to build borders around the empire with which they had become satisfied. Instead of remaining strong and advancing the empire, they became satisfied and stop growing and expanding.

The next thing that happened that since there was no longer any new revenues coming into the empire from newly captured lands, tax revenue flattened out but yet Romans began consuming themselves with their own pleasures and demanded more and more from their existing conquered lands. The tax burden became ever and ever greater. The social fabric of the Roman empire became such that they had forgotten how hard it was to build the empire originally. They became consumed with the opulence of the empire and thought that it was almost a birthright – that this wealth was something that they deserved rather than having been earned by the hard work of centuries of Romans before them. It’s kind of like Americans and their homes today. When you watch shows on HGTV and see what people consider must-haves and what they complain about a house NOT having, it makes you chuckle a bit. They will throw out a house from their search if it does not meet their 2019 sensibilities. The things that we consider must-haves in our homes today were extreme luxuries just 50 years ago. When you look at homes built in 2019 compared to 1969 or even 1979, what we consider must-haves were way out there luxuries back in the day. Could we today survive in 1969 when houses mainly were built without central air conditioning?

It was that idea of how self absorption can make a nation weak and how that might relate to us as churchgoing Christians in the 21st century as I read of these three final kings of the northern kingdom of Israel in 2 Kings 15:23-31. Let’s read it now:

23 In the fiftieth year of King Azariah of Judah, Pekahiah son of Menahem began to reign over Israel in Samaria; he reigned two years. 24 He did what was evil in the sight of the Lord; he did not turn away from the sins of Jeroboam son of Nebat, which he caused Israel to sin. 25 Pekah son of Remaliah, his captain, conspired against him with fifty of the Gileadites, and attacked him in Samaria, in the citadel of the palace along with Argob and Arieh; he killed him, and reigned in place of him. 26 Now the rest of the deeds of Pekahiah, and all that he did, are written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.

27 In the fifty-second year of King Azariah of Judah, Pekah son of Remaliah began to reign over Israel in Samaria; he reigned twenty years. 28 He did what was evil in the sight of the Lord; he did not depart from the sins of Jeroboam son of Nebat, which he caused Israel to sin.

29 In the days of King Pekah of Israel, King Tiglath-pileser of Assyria came and captured Ijon, Abel-beth-maacah, Janoah, Kedesh, Hazor, Gilead, and Galilee, all the land of Naphtali; and he carried the people captive to Assyria.

30 Then Hoshea son of Elah made a conspiracy against Pekah son of Remaliah, attacked him, and killed him; he reigned in place of him, in the twentieth year of Jotham son of Uzziah. 31 Now the rest of the acts of Pekah, and all that he did, are written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.

In this passage, we see the beginning of the end of the northern kingdom as an independent state. Hoshea was the last of the kings to rule over Israel as an independent nation. The nation had been so consumed with its own political intrigue and self-seeking that it became almost unaware of the changing world around it. Assyrian was becoming a military power in the region. However, Israel was so consumed with itself that it did not concern itself with protecting its borders. With all the factions and strife internally, Israel became weak militarily and could not organize itself as a nation to defend itself. The same has been true of all nations who were once strong. The same fate has occurred with many a world power over man’s history. Infighting and internal strife politically and a nation of people who become obsessed with their own pleasures always leads to a world power to decaying from within – just look at the Roman Empire, once the strongest of all empires in history, fell because it became weak from within.

It also made me think of how the church in America has stagnated for the most part and why it does not grow (with certain rare exceptions). Have we become like the Roman Empire? Have we become like the northern kingdom of Israel? Have we become satisfied with the way things are so that we begin building borders around ourselves rather than continuing to expand the kingdom? Are we more interested in what goes on inside rather than what’s going on outside? That’s the question we must ask ourselves. I liken it to those famous words of John F. Kennedy, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but, rather, what you can do for your country?”

Let us be a people that are more consumed with expanding the kingdom that we are with the must-have that we want in our dream house. Let us be a people that are willing to sacrifice our must-haves to make sure that people are hearing the gospel and the kingdom is expanding. Let us be a people who want people to know Jesus and will sacrifice to make sure it happens.

Amen and Amen.

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