1 Kings 9:10-14 – Stop Giving God Your Leftovers!

Posted: December 14, 2018 in 99-Uncategorized

1 Kings 9:10-14

Solomon’s Agreement with Hiram

Speaking in culinary terms, the colloquial term, “leftovers” brings to mind food that was not chosen at the meal at which it was originally served. It was the food thought to be good enough for a snack or a smaller meal at a later time. It was not the choice meat. It was not the choice vegetable. When one mentions to his/her family that they will be served leftovers at their next meal, it generally brings a lackadaisical response and not closely comparable to the response elicited by a freshly cooked meal. Oh boy! We’re having leftovers for dinner tonight! (infuse statement with sarcasm).

Leftovers do not elicit the idea of what you best is. Leftovers bring to mind the taking of the best already andleaving behind that which is the dregs. In this Christmas season that we are inright now, how often do we give “leftover” gifts to those that we have to givegifts to as opposed to those that we want to give gifts to. You know, those giftsyou HAVE to buy. Those ones that you run into Wal-Mart and pick up a gift cardfor Amazon in the smallest denomination possible. Those obligatory gifts thatyou do not put much thought into. These types of gifts are the ones thatsatisfy the custom but have no heart in them. The kind of gift that when youreceive it you go…well…ok…ummm…thanks. That nephew or niece or that person thatyou rarely see but are required to give a gift to but you have nothing investedreally in their lives. These are the gift card or regifting people on yourlist. It kind of reminds you of the movie, ChristmasVacation, starring Chevy Chase. In that movie, the old lady, AuntBethany, had a penchant for wrapping up presents from things that were aroundher house for Christmas presents for this annual extended family get-togetherat Christmas. As she had grown senile by the time we see her in this movie, shehad actually wrapped up her cat in one of the boxes! LOL! So, you get thepicture of what I am talking about, we have those gifts that we give that wereally don’t invest ourselves in selecting because the person we give the giftto is not a high priority.

That’s what I thought of this morning as I read 1 Kings 9:10-14 – how Solomon just kind of gave Hiram a thoughtless gift, a leftover gift, an oh-here gift, when he should have really invested in an amazing gift for Hiram, his closely allied king in the region. Hiram was insulted by the gift to the point that he turned it into a transaction rather than accepting the gift as a gift. He did not honor Hiram the way he should have. Let’s read what happened:

10 It took Solomon twenty years to build the Lord’s Temple and his own royal palace. At the end of that time, 11 he gave twenty towns in the land of Galilee to King Hiram of Tyre. (Hiram had previously provided all the cedar and cypress timber and gold that Solomon had requested.) 12 But when Hiram came from Tyre to see the towns Solomon had given him, he was not at all pleased with them. 13 “What kind of towns are these, my brother?” he asked. So Hiram called that area Cabul (which means “worthless”), as it is still known today. 14 Nevertheless, Hiram paid Solomon 9,000 pounds of gold.

In this passage, we see that Solomon had built his own house, and God’s house, with all the materials that Hiram had provided, and they had this good relationship — so now it says: “King Solomon gave Hiram 20 cities in the land of Galilee”, evidently as a gift for all he had done for him, and as an expression of good will for the relationship they had. This “gift” from Solomon apparently was insulting to Hiram in exchange for gold that apparently Solomon needed. Apparently, Hiram did not think that these 20 cities were worth 9,000 pounds of gold. Because of the relationship that they had in the past, Hiram was expecting the land and the cities in it to be beautiful, useful land.

However, Solomon gave him the worst of his kingdom. Galilee, as you may remember from the New Testament, is a land from which nothing good ever came out of. The land that Jesus grew up in was a poor area with limited resources which caused people there not to be able to afford good educations, good jobs, and so on. Nothing good every came out of Galilee, as the saying went in the Bible. This kind of disrespect is something that we must think about when it comes to how we treat God when it comes to our gifts to God – our time, our talent, our resources.

So what can we take away from this short passage? What is it that we can apply to our daily lives here in the 21st century as modern Christians? I think it has to do with how we honor God. Do you know the Bible tells us that we can insult God by what we try to give Him? Repeatedly God tells us in His word that there are “gifts” which people try to give to Him which He rejects. In Malachi 1 the people of Israel were bringing their blemished animals and offering them as sacrifices to God instead of bringing their first and best. So God said in Malachi 1:10, “Oh that there were one among you who would shut the gates … I am not pleased with you, says the LORD of hosts, nor will I accept an offering from you.” God told those people, your “gift” of these unwanted animals is an insult to Me. He said in v. 1:8, “Why not offer it to your governor?” You wouldn’t give something like that to him — why would you give it to Me?”

Malachi puts it simply, “In your tithes and contributions (3:8c).” Malachi says, using the robber motif, that the people have been, in effect, stealing from God. As a consequence, the Lord has withheld blessing. Their covenant faithfulness is lacking in comparison to God’s faithfulness. They again were picking and choosing which covenant stipulations to observe. They had withheld their tithes or at least the full extent of them that the Law commanded them to bring to God (Leviticus 27:30, Deuteronomy 12:5-18, Deuteronomy 14:22-29, Numbers 18:21-32). This rebuke is not something isolated to a few individuals. It is a national rebuke when the Scripture says, “the whole nation of you (3:9c).”

Maybe, this rebuke is part of the vicious spiral of degeneration that Malachi observed. With the failure of the people to support the Levitical priesthood as God commanded, it is possible their passion for their job was correspondent to the amount of support that they received. Neither has pleased God. Service to God should not be contingent on the amount of support received for the effort. All parties of Israel are somehow shocked that they have not been blessed. The command was to teach faithful obedience. It was to be an act of trust in the Lord. As Paul says in 2 Corinthians, “Each one must do as he has made up his mind, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.” The requirement of a tenth was a benchmark of obedience. Paul’s message is that of loving willingness rather than ritualistic adherence. His expectation was that believers should give above and beyond as they had means. The message is that one should give liberally not out of compulsion. As Hemphill states, “the giving of tithes and offerings in Scripture cannot be separated from the heart condition of the giver.” 

Malachi calls into question whether the Israelites place God first in their lives since they have a spirit of disobedience. In our passage today, Solomon shows a similar disrespect to Hiram. By contrast, those who give God the best of their wealth, God’s response will be to “open the windows of heaven for you and pour down a blessing for you until there is no more need” (3:10b). Malachi shows that obedience provides blessing. Malachi praises a humble and giving heart. Similarly, the saga of Ananias and Sapphira in Acts 5:1-11 deals with this very issue of holding back and giving God what is left over but yet at the same time publicly displaying piety. In this scene from Acts, one understands the biblical imperative that all of our resources come from God not just the tenth that is considered the minimum to return to the Lord. When His people usurp their place and begin keeping what they wish to themselves, it is dishonoring to their loving Father. Further, this lack of obedience calls into question whether His people can be trusted to be His representatives here on earth. If God acts to preserve the integrity of His name to the nations through his representatives here on earth (through the rebukes to His people announced through Malachi or the deaths of hypocrites in Acts), these corrective actions produce increased confidence in the truthfulness of God’s message itself.  What remains after rebuke and repentance is a message that God is primary in His people’s lives. He is not the God of leftovers. As Polaski states, “Those who do not wish to live in covenant with God fail to reverence God. The job of the covenant community is to reverence God and thus to oppose such conduct…in the context of God’s faithful devotion to an unfailing covenant.”

Modern day people of God should worship God fervently with their hearts daily – more than just on the Sundays one finds it convenient to go to church. Modern day believers should display worship of God in their daily lives. One’s service to God should be more than serving the body of the church or the world outside only when it does not interfere with work, or school or our favorite hobbies. Our finances should reflect God. Biblical financial behavior honors God. When one gives God the first fruits of one’s finances, it honors Him. The believer should order his finances in a manner that God get the best meat of one’s finances, not the leftover fat.

Do we respond to Him with leftovers? Are giving God thoughtless gifts in the same way that Solomon gives this gift to Hiram? Or do we respond to him with the best food of our lives, the first check that we write, the “get to serve at church” rather than the “have to serve at church”, the thinking of how does this honor God in everything we do? Those who believe in God want to make His glory known to the world so that others may come unto Him. How does that happen? Lives are lived where everything is done to honor God not oneself. Stop bringing God your leftovers. Honor Him with the best of everything that you do (your time, your talents, your resources). To be uncommonly devoted to the Lord in everything that we do rather than being like the culture is what draws the world unto Him. Put God first in your finances (and every other area of your life) and honor Him with your best gifts! Treat Him like the person you most want to buy a gift for rather than someone your run into Wal-Mart for and get a gift card of the lowest denomination on your way to the party.

Amen and Amen.

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