1 Kings 4:1-19 – Another Boring List of Names in the Bible? Not So Fast, My Friend!

Posted: November 5, 2018 in 99-Uncategorized

1 Kings 4:1-19
Solomon’s Officials and Governors

Lee Corso, one of the college football personalities on the show, College GameDay, which airs on Saturday mornings during the college football season has a saying when he disagrees with one of the three other personalities on the show. That saying is “Not so fast, my friend!” That seems appropriate here in this passage. The first impression you get is, oh no! Not another list of names! However, when you dig deeper into it and think about this passage, it has much to teach us.

When you have a lot of different areas for which you are responsible, it is impossible for you to manage it all yourself. Solomon understood this concept. He was a ruler of a vast geographical area as well as over millions of Israelites. He just could not do it all himself. He had his closest advisers and then he had governors for twelve districts (these districts roughly approximated the boundaries established for the twelve tribes of Israel). His closest advisors included secretaries that were responsible for various functions of the national government. He had a historian which would be the equivalent of a secretary of state in today’s world. He had a guy in charge of managing the various and sometimes competing issues of the various district governors and several other guys who had defined responsibilities. For each region/district, there was a governor who managed the affairs of each region so as to keep all but the most important issues from having to reach the king in Jerusalem. It all sounds very modern and efficient and it most likely was.

Solomon understood that he could not be tied down with every decision with the nation and the government itself as large as it was. He needed to have people working for him that would take care of specified avenues of responsibility. We know that Solomon had the reputation in Israelite history as being the wisest of kings. So, there are certainly things that we can learn from his organization of his government that we can use in our lives whether we lead in churches or in secular organizations.

Let’s read about the organization of Solomon’s government now in 1 Kings 4:1-19:

Chapter 4
1 King Solomon now ruled over all Israel, 2 and these were his high officials:

Azariah son of Zadok was the priest.
3
Elihoreph and Ahijah, the sons of Shisha, were court secretaries.
Jehoshaphat son of Ahilud was the royal historian.
4
Benaiah son of Jehoiada was commander of the army.
Zadok and Abiathar were priests.
5
Azariah son of Nathan was in charge of the district governors.
Zabud son of Nathan, a priest, was a trusted adviser to the king.
6
Ahishar was manager of the palace property.
Adoniram son of Abda was in charge of forced labor.

7 Solomon also had twelve district governors who were over all Israel. They were responsible for providing food for the king’s household. Each of them arranged provisions for one month of the year. 8 These are the names of the twelve governors:

Ben-hur, in the hill country of Ephraim.
9
Ben-deker, in Makaz, Shaalbim, Beth-shemesh, and Elon-bethhanan.
10
Ben-hesed, in Arubboth, including Socoh and all the land of Hepher.
11
Ben-abinadab, in all of Naphoth-dor.[a] (He was married to Taphath, one of Solomon’s daughters.)
12
Baana son of Ahilud, in Taanach and Megiddo, all of Beth-shan[b] near Zarethan below Jezreel, and all the territory from Beth-shan to Abel-meholah and over to Jokmeam.
13
Ben-geber, in Ramoth-gilead, including the Towns of Jair (named for Jair of the tribe of Manasseh[c]) in Gilead, and in the Argob region of Bashan, including sixty large fortified towns with bronze bars on their gates.
14
Ahinadab son of Iddo, in Mahanaim.
15
Ahimaaz, in Naphtali. (He was married to Basemath, another of Solomon’s daughters.)
16
Baana son of Hushai, in Asher and in Aloth.
17
Jehoshaphat son of Paruah, in Issachar.
18
Shimei son of Ela, in Benjamin.
19
Geber son of Uri, in the land of Gilead,[d] including the territories of King Sihon of the Amorites and King Og of Bashan.
There was also one governor over the land of Judah.[e]
In this passage, we see that just as the story of the mothers contending over one baby was an example of Solomon’s great wisdom, this chapter also shows Solomon’s wisdom. The wise way he selected, trained, empowered, and supervised leaders is clearly seen. Solomon was a leader of leaders. No wise leader does it all themselves. They know how to delegate responsibility and authority and get the job done. Solomon’s great wisdom enabled him to see the needs to get, train, and employ the right people to meet those needs.

Solomon’s government was structured much like that in modern nations. He had officials who served as ministers or department secretaries over their specific areas of responsibility. Jehoshaphat, who had served under David (2 Samuel 8:16; 20:24), continued as historian. As such he was more a chief of protocol than a ‘remembrancer’ or recorder of the past. His status was almost that of a Secretary of State. Solomon had twelve governors over all Israel, who provided food for the king and his household; each one made provision for one month of the year. Twelve governors were responsible for taxation in their individual districts. The districts were not strictly separated by tribal borders but often according to mountains, land, and region.

So, earlier I said that there is something that we can learn from Solomon’s organization of his government that we can use whether we are working in churches or in secular organizations. The things that I see are Solomon had defined responsibilities and boundaries for each position.

Each job had its responsibility and everybody had a supervisor. In this way, Solomon was able to keep the number of people reporting directly to him to a minimum and he allowed his supervisors to manage their people below them without interference. This freed Solomon up to deal with the big issues of the nation and to be boat captain who decides the direction of the ship rather than dealing with any and every issue. That issue I think is evidenced particularly by the fact that he had a supervisor for the 12 regional governors. Instead of having to deal directly with the region specific issues of 12 guys himself, Solomon placed a supervisor over them that could deal with their specific issues and then only pass up to the king those issues that require a national rather than a regional answer. As well, there were boundaries for each position. Each person in the chain had defined responsibilities and defined authority. They were empowered to manage their very specific responsibilities and only bubble up those things to those above them that required a more broad or even national answer.

We see in Solomon’s story how society depends on the work of myriad people, coupled with structures and systems to organize large scale production and distribution. The human capacity to organize work is evidence of our creation in the image of a God who brings order out of chaos on a universal and then earthly worldwide scale (Genesis 1). How fitting that the Bible portrays this ability this passage on the organization of Solomon’s government. Perhaps what we take away from this episode is that God is intensely interested in the art of coordinating human work and creativity to accomplish God’s purposes in the world. We see time and time again how God organizes his people to achieve his goals in the world – the organization of the Israelite tribes, the division of the tribes into legal units, the organization of the tabernacle and temple priests, the organization of the disciples (the twelve and the inner three), and ultimately the organization of the church under Paul’s supervision.

So, let us celebrate that God is a God of order and not chaos and examine what we can do to better define and organization our lives to reduce the amount of chaos in it. Whether its our personal finances by defining our budget of income sources and expenses, whether it’s the division of labor in our marriages (agreeing to what is each spouse’s responsibility), whether it’s sitting down with our kids to define their chores or to define their behavior expectations, whether it’s looking at our jobs and assessing ways to make changes that will help us better stay on top of what we are responsible for, you name it! We can all operate better when we reassess our situation and think of ways to be better organized. We can spend less time worry about little things and more time worrying about what wants us to do for Him in the world as His image bearers as the sons and daughters of God.

Amen and Amen.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s