Archive for February, 2018

1 Samuel 18:1-16 (Part 3 of 3)
Saul Becomes Jealous of David

Would you give up your seemingly rightful claim to a position that should be yours because of succession to someone who was more talented than you? What if you were in line for a promotion but the company brought in a new guy from the outside to take the position? Would you be able to handle the blow to your pride? Would you be able to work with that person in the future – knowing they took the position that should have been yours but you knew in your heart that they were more talented. Could you swallow that humble pie?

That’s kind of what a portion of this passage today, 1 Samuel 18:1-16, is about. The story of Jonathan and David is one of the greatest friendships of the Bible. We glory in the brotherhood between these two guys. They were the best of pals. They would have hung out together even if they had not been royal. They just genuinely were like the best of brothers without being blood relations. They knew when the other was going to zig so they would then zag. They were ying and yang. They were frick and frack. But when you think about it, these two could have been and most likely should have been mortal enemies.

The way that Jonathan reacted to David’s anointing as king when the throne of Israel by rights in human standards should have been his is nothing short of amazing. Jonathan was Saul’s son and was next in line to be king of Israel. But God took the bloodline of Saul away and gave the royal line to David. Jonathan could have easily been enraged by jealousy to the point he wanted to kill David to regain his hold on the bloodline to the throne. That’s what most people would have done. Killing family and friends and enemies to gain a throne is as old as the concept of royalty through the ages. Jonathan was different. Jonathan was a contrast to even his own father. Saul spent the second half of his reign as king going insane with jealousy and murderous intent toward David.

Yesterday, we talked about how jealousy in reconciling relationships that have suffered infidelity can destroy the reconciliation process. Jealousy can destroy the very thing that a person is wanting to save for themselves. Jealousy can consume and destroy the feelings one person has for another. Saul was so consumed with jealousy that it ruined half his reign as king of Israel. He was so consumed with jealousy and murderous intent toward David that he basically forgot to rule the nation. However, Jonathan was so different. He saw David not as a threat to him but rather as just another guy doing what he’s got to do in life. Some of us let other people live rent free in our head as the saying goes. Jonathan could have become obsessed with David like his dad while David went about life not realizing that he was the object of someone’s sick and twisted obsession. Jonathan just saw another guy with the right to live his life. Jonathan saw that David was not supposed to be orbiting his planet and that David was a planet of his own. Sometimes, we get so focused on ourselves that we see all others as orbiting around us not as independent people of their own. Jonathan started from a place of seeing the world as more than just his playground. There’s a humility in learning that fact. The fact that we are not the center of the universe. When we see others as having the same right to breath as us, we can have close friendships like David and Jonathan.

With that idea of being humble enough to see others as having the same right to breath, so to speak, as us, let us read today’s passage for the third and final of three reads, 1 Samuel 18:1-16:

Chapter 18
1 After David had finished talking with Saul, he met Jonathan, the king’s son. There was an immediate bond between them, for Jonathan loved David. 2 From that day on Saul kept David with him and wouldn’t let him return home. 3 And Jonathan made a solemn pact with David, because he loved him as he loved himself. 4 Jonathan sealed the pact by taking off his robe and giving it to David, together with his tunic, sword, bow, and belt.

5 Whatever Saul asked David to do, David did it successfully. So Saul made him a commander over the men of war, an appointment that was welcomed by the people and Saul’s officers alike.

6 When the victorious Israelite army was returning home after David had killed the Philistine, women from all the towns of Israel came out to meet King Saul. They sang and danced for joy with tambourines and cymbals.[a] 7 This was their song:

“Saul has killed his thousands,
and David his ten thousands!”

8 This made Saul very angry. “What’s this?” he said. “They credit David with ten thousands and me with only thousands. Next they’ll be making him their king!” 9 So from that time on Saul kept a jealous eye on David.

10 The very next day a tormenting spirit[b] from God overwhelmed Saul, and he began to rave in his house like a madman. David was playing the harp, as he did each day. But Saul had a spear in his hand, 11 and he suddenly hurled it at David, intending to pin him to the wall. But David escaped him twice.

12 Saul was then afraid of David, for the Lord was with David and had turned away from Saul. 13 Finally, Saul sent him away and appointed him commander over 1,000 men, and David faithfully led his troops into battle.

14 David continued to succeed in everything he did, for the Lord was with him. 15 When Saul recognized this, he became even more afraid of him. 16 But all Israel and Judah loved David because he was so successful at leading his troops into battle.

In this passage, we see that, when David and Jonathan met, they became close friends at once. Their friendship is one of the deepest and closest recorded in the Bible. They based their friendship on their mutual and independent commitments to the Lord their God and not just on each other. They let nothing come between them, not even career or family problems. They drew closer together when their friendship was tested. And, they remained friends to the end of their time together on earth. Isn’t it amazing that Jonathan, the prince of Israel, later realized that David, and not he, would the next king, but even that did not weaken his love for David? Jonathan would have much rather have lost the throne than lose his closest friend.

Are you capable of seeing those people in your sphere of influence as equal to you or maybe even greater than you? Are you able to see the rights of others as more important than your own? Do you have a friend that you would lay down your life for? Are you willing to admit that someone in your sphere of influence is a better leader, a better employee, a more talented person than you? Are you willing to say, hey, this dude is just more talented than me and I need to submit to his leadership rather than bellyaching and scheming against that person? Or are you going to let jealousy consume you and you become obsessed wit that person and let them live rent free in your head? Are you going to let your obsession with them become your god?

Or are you going to be like Jonathan? Jonathan is a Old Testament symbol of sorts for Jesus Christ. By all rights Jesus is the Son of God and does not need to humble Himself for anyone. He is of one and the same essence as the Father and the Holy Spirit. He is God. He does not need to submit to anyone. He is rightfully the king of the universe. He is the Creator. However, he so loved us that he submitted Himself to live in the flesh. He submitted Himself to the Father in heaven while He was on earth. He did not have to do this. He could have said I will not. He could have said I am a co-equal part of the Trinity and I will not lower myself to live in the flesh and submit myself to the leadership of the Father, to whom I am co-equal along with the Holy Spirit. However, because of the entire trinity of God so loving us they He sent His Son and His Son willingly submitted Himself to live in the flesh and live under the leadership of the Father so that the Son could become the perfect sinless sacrifice for all time for all men’s sins. Jesus did this because He loved us and was willing to do all this so that we would have a way to be reconciled to Him, the Father, the Holy Spirit. Jonathan so loved David as his best friend that he willingly gave up his right to the throne without a fuss and submitted himself to David’s leadership because he knew that was what was best for Israel.

Jonathan did that for David. Jesus did that for us. How can we be so arrogant as to think that all the people in the world orbit around us and that the world is here to serve us. Let us be humble enough to see others with the same humility and servantlike hearts and Jonathan and Jesus.

Amen and Amen.

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1 Samuel 18:1-16 (Part 2 of 3)
Saul Becomes Jealous of David

Jealousy is an ugly emotion that can never be satisfied. It always must be fed to the point of destroying relationships. Have you had a relationship like that? It most often happens in marriages where there has been infidelity. I have seen too many couples try to reconcile immediately in the aftermath of the discovery of an adulterous affair. I have been there myself. You love your wife or the idea of your wife so much that you say that you are willing to forgive, but are we really ready?

The one who has been cheated on says that they can forgive because it is the Christian thing to do. We are told by our Christian friends and mentors that it is the right thing. And we know it is the right thing. God hates divorce and He wants us to love unconditionally and He wants us to forgive. And you, wanting to be a good Christian man or woman buy into those sentiments and fully believe that we should immediately reconcile with our spouse. But are you really ready for what all that entails?

After the initial wondrous first few days of a reconciliation, then, reality sets in. You start to wonder what your spouse is doing when you are not with them. If they are more than 30 minutes late to anything, you wonder and your mind starts to wander. You begin to overcompensate by texting and calling. You begin to shower them with affection and showing up unannounced at work. It all begins to build into this desperate need to know exactly what your spouse is thinking, which is of course is impossible. The emotions of jealousy begin to occupy your mind. You build up these scenarios where you feel completely lost and feel that your spouse really doesn’t love you like you love them. You want them to love you like you love them. But no matter what they do, it is never enough to satisfy that jealousy in your heart. It eats. It consumes. It is never satisified. It becomes an overweight emotion that consumes all sugary substances in our life. It requires more and more and more from the spouse that cheated to the point that they feel smothered by the neediness of the spouse who has been cheated upon. The weird thing about these spouses who have been cheated upon is that all the actions that they intend in their mind to get their spouse to prove their love actually drives their spouse away. Are you really ready for all those emotions that are going to drive you insane with jealousy? Are you really ready?

If you are a spouse who has cheated who then comes to the realization that an adulterous affair is just smoke and mirrors and just the best sides of people and not real life over the long haul and then decide to reconcile with your spouse, are you really ready for this? After that wondrous first few days of a reconciliation, then, reality sets in. As the cheating spouse who is trying to reconcile their marriage, you gotta go into to it realizing that you have got to go the extra mile. You have profoundly altered the relationship with your infidelity. You have profoundly hurt your spouse to the core. You must realize that to them it is almost as if a death has occurred. It is in some ways worse than death. When you were having the affair, the you that you once were to your spouse died but yet they still see you walking around. In that way, it is actually worse than death. You must treat them as a grieving person. You must go the extra mile. Are you really ready for that? Are you ready to have to report your every move? Are you really ready to have to do that for an extended period of time? Are you really ready to validate your spouse as the center of your universe sometimes hourly for an extended period of time? Are you really ready for that? Do you love them enough to be smothered for a while and maybe an extended while. Are you willing to overlook rude comments about your past infidelity? Are you willing to see them seething and smoldering with jealous anger that is eating them alive and know that you are the cause of it? Are you really ready for that?

That’s why I often think it is best in adulterous situations for the two spouses take some time to evaluate these questions. It may even require some living apart but with an eye toward ultimate reconciliation. The emotions of jealousy are so raw and so all consuming for the jilted spouse that it can be ultimately destructive to a relationship if reconciliation is not handled properly. A spouse who has cheated also must realize that the jilted spouse is a grieving spouse that you must love through some tough times. The anger phase of recovery from grief can be a long one. The jilted spouse also must be prepared to trust even when jealousy and past experience says you shouldn’t. That is a tough task for many and only a few can actually achieve over time. Jealousy can suck the life out of a relationship. Are you ready for that if you are trying to reconcile a relationship?

With that idea of trying to save a relationship from the devastating effects of that horrid and all consuming emotion of jealousy, let us read today’s passage for the second of three reads, 1 Samuel 18:1-16:

Chapter 18
1 After David had finished talking with Saul, he met Jonathan, the king’s son. There was an immediate bond between them, for Jonathan loved David. 2 From that day on Saul kept David with him and wouldn’t let him return home. 3 And Jonathan made a solemn pact with David, because he loved him as he loved himself. 4 Jonathan sealed the pact by taking off his robe and giving it to David, together with his tunic, sword, bow, and belt.

5 Whatever Saul asked David to do, David did it successfully. So Saul made him a commander over the men of war, an appointment that was welcomed by the people and Saul’s officers alike.

6 When the victorious Israelite army was returning home after David had killed the Philistine, women from all the towns of Israel came out to meet King Saul. They sang and danced for joy with tambourines and cymbals.[a] 7 This was their song:

“Saul has killed his thousands,
and David his ten thousands!”

8 This made Saul very angry. “What’s this?” he said. “They credit David with ten thousands and me with only thousands. Next they’ll be making him their king!” 9 So from that time on Saul kept a jealous eye on David.

10 The very next day a tormenting spirit[b] from God overwhelmed Saul, and he began to rave in his house like a madman. David was playing the harp, as he did each day. But Saul had a spear in his hand, 11 and he suddenly hurled it at David, intending to pin him to the wall. But David escaped him twice.

12 Saul was then afraid of David, for the Lord was with David and had turned away from Saul. 13 Finally, Saul sent him away and appointed him commander over 1,000 men, and David faithfully led his troops into battle.

14 David continued to succeed in everything he did, for the Lord was with him. 15 When Saul recognized this, he became even more afraid of him. 16 But all Israel and Judah loved David because he was so successful at leading his troops into battle.

In this passage, we see that Saul’s appreciation for David turned to jealousy as people began to applaud David’s exploits. In a jealous rage, Saul attempted to murder David by hurling a spear at him (1 Samuel 18:11-12). Jealousy may not seem to be a sin, but, in reality, it is one step short of murder. Jealousy starts as you resent a rival. It leads to your wishing that they were removed. Then, it manifests itself in words and/or actions. Beware of letting jealousy get a foothold in your life.

Saul tried to kill David because he was jealous of David’s popularity, yet David continued to protect and comfort Saul. Perhaps, people have been jealous of you and have even attacked you in some way. They may be intimidated by your strengths, which makes them conscious of their own shortcomings. It would be natural, according to our normal fleshly desires, to strike back or to avoid them. A better response is to befriend them (see Matthew 5:43-44) and to ask God for the strength to continue loving them as David kept on loving Saul.

Jealousy is an all-consuming, life-sucking, air-depriving emotion. It sucks that life right out of a relationship. Are you willing to love someone through jealousy? If you are the jealous one, are you willing to trust when the fiber of your flesh calls out to you to make someone comply with what you need? Are you willing to realize that jealousy makes you think stuff that’s not real? Are you willing to realize that you have to give that object of your jealousy over to the Lord? Are you really ready to do that? It takes a big man or big woman to trust when every fiber of your being cries out not to! If you are a person who is the subject of someone’s jealousy, are you willing to grant them grace and love them through it? Are you really ready for that?

Are you ready to grant grace? Are you ready to love someone even when they are jealous of you and feel like they are sucking the life right out of you? Are you willing to seek forgiveness for your wrong to them over and over and over and over?

Are you ready to trust someone who has hurt you? Are you really ready to forgive? Are you really ready to put the past in the past and not live in it and relive it every day? Are you willing to move forward and not punish the other person for the wrong they did your forever? Are you willing to give up your supposed moral superiority over them in the name of forgiveness and saving the relationship?

Just think. God does all that for us through His Son Jesus Christ. He puts all the wrongs in the past as far as the east is from the west. He suffers with our fleshly desires and loves us anyway. He loves us back to life and reconciliation with Him.

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 18:1-16 (Part 1 of 3)
Saul Becomes Jealous of David

Last night, my wife and I braved the rain and cold of a Moline, IL winter night to have a date night at the Taxslayer Center, the local coliseum venue here in downtown Moline (right on the Mississippi River), with about 8,000 others. We were used to venues like The Well (Bon Secours Wellness Arena) in Greenville, SC and The Spectrum Center in Charlotte, NC so we left plenty early to get to the “Slayer”. In those two venues in Charlotte and Greenville, the downtowns are more densely packed and thus parking is at a premium for coliseum events which involve parking garages and walking. Well, at the Slayer, getting to the venue and to the parking was easy peazy. And then we only had to walk about maybe the length of a football field to get to the entrance. So, first date at a concert in downtown Moline was a great experience except for the cold rain before the concert and, though it wasn’t raining afterward, the cold wind off the Mississippi cut right through you after having been inside the warm arena for 3 ½ to 4 hours. But all in all the experience was fun. We got to see Mandesa, Danny Gokey, Finding Favour, and finally, the man, Toby Mac. A great collection of Christian artists of which Toby was the topper. Man, what a great show, he and his band put on.

But that’s just background information to what I wanted to talk about this morning. It was something that was said in the 45 minutes that we were in our seats before the show started munching on an order of French fries and sucking down Pepsi-Colas (for some reason we were both soooo thirsty – that was about the best Pepsi I’ve ever had) that caught my heart and mind. You know at these Christian concerts during the lead up to the concert in that hour after the doors open, people are milling around, getting stuff at the concession stand, getting settled in their seats, talking to the people or group that they came with, the main act and supporting acts will invite pastors to come back stage so that they can bless and encourage them. So often it is pastors who encourage their flocks but it is rare that they receive encouragement themselves.

I said to myself, “oh that’s nice. Pastors need encouragement too. That would be pretty cool to be able to meet Toby Mac and the others and get prayed for by these giants in the Christian contemporary music industry.” After that thought, I did not think much more about it. Then a few minutes after I saw a group of pastors head toward the backstage entrance area and after it was too late for me to join them, I realized, “hey wait a minute! I am a pastor too. I am a pastor now!” That’s kind of really the first time that it hit me is that I am a staff pastor at my new church here in Moline. Me, a pastor, can you believe that? I cannot at times believe that it is true.

It got me to thinking about how pastors can become celebrities. Even if they do not have widespread popularity, they can become celebrities among their own flock in the local church. Even if you are not some nationally or internationally renowned mega-church pastor and author of a bunch of books, you can become a celebrity within your own church. And, you don’t even have to be the lead or senior pastor within that church. Youth pastors, family pastors, worship pastors, and even administrative pastors can become celebrities within the local church. And if you are not careful, you can become aware of a certain amount of importance that people place on you. You can become aware of a certain amount of adoration given you as a pastor.

It got me to thinking too that I need always have that feeling of humility about being a pastor to the point that it’s hard to believe that I am a pastor now. I think I need to continue to have that feeling of wow what a job Jesus has done in my life. If people just knew that my life is a story of redemption from self-seeking from making idols of things other than God himself and just a hedonistic lifestyle for much of my life. Why would God call me to be a pastor? It’s so humbling that I really didn’t think of myself as being a pastor til last night when that invitation came to go backstage and be prayed for. I hope that I always keep that humility of thinking “wow, me a pastor!” as we progress down this road in Moline.

With that idea of remaining humble and not letting ourselves become a celebrity couple even just within our own church, Calvary Church of the Quad Cities, let us read today’s passage for the first of three reads, 1 Samuel 18:1-16:

Chapter 18
1 After David had finished talking with Saul, he met Jonathan, the king’s son. There was an immediate bond between them, for Jonathan loved David. 2 From that day on Saul kept David with him and wouldn’t let him return home. 3 And Jonathan made a solemn pact with David, because he loved him as he loved himself. 4 Jonathan sealed the pact by taking off his robe and giving it to David, together with his tunic, sword, bow, and belt.

5 Whatever Saul asked David to do, David did it successfully. So Saul made him a commander over the men of war, an appointment that was welcomed by the people and Saul’s officers alike.

6 When the victorious Israelite army was returning home after David had killed the Philistine, women from all the towns of Israel came out to meet King Saul. They sang and danced for joy with tambourines and cymbals.[a] 7 This was their song:

“Saul has killed his thousands,
and David his ten thousands!”

8 This made Saul very angry. “What’s this?” he said. “They credit David with ten thousands and me with only thousands. Next they’ll be making him their king!” 9 So from that time on Saul kept a jealous eye on David.

10 The very next day a tormenting spirit[b] from God overwhelmed Saul, and he began to rave in his house like a madman. David was playing the harp, as he did each day. But Saul had a spear in his hand, 11 and he suddenly hurled it at David, intending to pin him to the wall. But David escaped him twice.

12 Saul was then afraid of David, for the Lord was with David and had turned away from Saul. 13 Finally, Saul sent him away and appointed him commander over 1,000 men, and David faithfully led his troops into battle.

14 David continued to succeed in everything he did, for the Lord was with him. 15 When Saul recognized this, he became even more afraid of him. 16 But all Israel and Judah loved David because he was so successful at leading his troops into battle.

In this passage, we see that, while Saul’s popularity made him proud and arrogant, David remained humble (see ahead at 1 Samuel 18:23) even when the entire nation praised him. Although David succeeded in almost everything he tried and became famous throughout the land, he refused to use his popular support to his advantage against Saul. We, like David, should not allow popularity to twist our perception of our own importance. It’s comparatively easy to be humble when you are not on center stage, how will you react when you are on center stage and in the spotlight?

Help me oh Lord as I grow into this pastoral position to remain humble, faithful and teachable. Help me to honor you and not myself. Help me to be a David-like servant to the cause of the kingdom. Help me to serve and not seek service to myself. Help me to keep my eye on the ball as to what my calling is – to serve you full-time my Lord. Help me to keep in mind what is important and it is You and not me.

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 17:51b-58
Israel Routs the Philistines

My last words of advice to my former staff at Fujikura America, Inc. and at LifeSong Church was to “be excellent even when nobody’s watching.” That is the mentality that I wanted to leave them with. That was the mentality that I had while working at both places was that no matter if no one watched or even cared about what I did, I wanted to be excellent at what I did. I always wanted my work to be more than what was expected. I wanted to exceed all expectations for my work. I wanted to be excellent because doing things half-ass is just not in my nature. I have always done whatever it took to get the job done and get it done right. If that means 80 hours in one week, so be it. If that means working from morning til midnight to get the job done, so be it. I also wanted my work to speak for itself. I wanted for someone to be able to come back a year later without me around and be able to figure out what I did based on the documentation available. I wanted to be excellent even after I was gone. I wanted my body of work over the past decade to speak for itself. I wanted to leave my jobs back in South Carolina better than the way that I found them when I started. I can say that I did that.

In my line of work, as the finance & administrative chief, usually the only time that you get notoriety is when something breaks, doesn’t work, blows up, etc. As a result, the best compliment that you can often get as an finance officer is when there is nothing said about finance or administration. In other words, when things are operating as they are supposed to, there is silence. So, you just got to want to be excellent for excellence’s sake. When you provide order and calmness, people just come to expect that and nothing is said unless something breaks. You gotta want to be excellent without accolades all the time. You gotta wanna be excellent because that’s just who you are. You gotta wanna be excellent because often times it is our work that speaks for us as Christ followers. If you are excellent when no one is looking, that speaks volumes. We as Christ followers should want our work to give Christ glory not shame. We should do our work as unto the Lord. We should be excellent because we work for an audience of One. We should be excellent because our desire to be good at what we do speaks volumes to others about who we are. No matter what we do, we do it with a desire for excellence. No matter what we do, it should be done with the idea that being excellent allows us to say to the world that we are giving glory to the Lord in all that we do. Why not be excellent? We should be excellent out of thanksgiving and praise for what the Lord has done in our lives. Why not be excellent? As Christ’s children, people get their impression of Jesus Christ from us. We can demonstrate that because we love Jesus so much that we give him the best of what we do no matter what it is or who is watching. We are excellent because we love Jesus!

It was that idea of doing your best no matter if you get recognized for it or not that came to mind this morning as I read through this passage, 1 Samuel 17:51b-58. Let’s read it together now:

When the Philistines saw that their champion was dead, they turned and ran. 52 Then the men of Israel and Judah gave a great shout of triumph and rushed after the Philistines, chasing them as far as Gath[a] and the gates of Ekron. The bodies of the dead and wounded Philistines were strewn all along the road from Shaaraim, as far as Gath and Ekron. 53 Then the Israelite army returned and plundered the deserted Philistine camp. 54 (David took the Philistine’s head to Jerusalem, but he stored the man’s armor in his own tent.)

55 As Saul watched David go out to fight the Philistine, he asked Abner, the commander of his army, “Abner, whose son is this young man?”

“I really don’t know,” Abner declared.

56 “Well, find out who he is!” the king told him.

57 As soon as David returned from killing Goliath, Abner brought him to Saul with the Philistine’s head still in his hand. 58 “Tell me about your father, young man,” Saul said.

And David replied, “His name is Jesse, and we live in Bethlehem.”

In this passage, we see that, although David had played his harp many times in front of Saul, Saul’s question to Abner seems to show that he didn’t know David very well. Perhaps, since David was scheduled to marry Saul’s daughter if he was successful (1 Samuel 17:25), Saul wanted to know more about his family. Alternatively, it could have been that Saul’s unstable mental condition (1 Samuel 16:14) may have prevented him from recognizing David. Maybe, Saul was trying to diffuse the popularity of David that was sure to grow from him killing the giant, Goliath. It was kind of a way to put David in his place as the unknown warrior to the king. Regardless, there are times in which we will toil in anonymity. There are times when we will toil and others will belittle our contribution or even steal the credit for our work. However, if we do our work to simply get accolades from others then we will forever be yanked about by the winds of others’ opinions and favor. If we do our work as unto the Lord, we will strive for excellence no matter who is looking or if anyone’s looking.

Do you see your work as unrelated to your walk as a Christ follower? Do you do things half way at work? Do you give your church half way measures because, after all, it’s just volunteer work? How many times have you done work for the church but did not give it your all? Do you give your regular job the best of you? Do you give your church the best of you? Do you do things short-shrift because nobody’s watching? Do you only give your all when you know you are going to get notoriety for having done the work?

What if nobody’s watching? Are you willing to be excellent? What if you toil away for decades at a job that no one even knows who you are? Are you willing to be excellent? Be excellent even when nobody’s watching or nobody cares. Be excellent. Be excellent because you are a Christ follower. Be excellent because everything we do speaks of Jesus Christ. Even the way we do our jobs in the secular world speaks volumes to others about what a Christ follower is like. A Christ follower wants to be excellent no matter what because we are giving glory to our Savior, we are giving thanks to our Savior.

Are you excellent when nobody’s watching?

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 17:12-51a
David Kills Goliath

New jobs, no matter how much experience you have, are daunting in those first few days when people are training you in what your responsibilities are to be. It all can become a blur of information and procedures. New names. New software. Things that don’t necessarily make much sense right now will become clearer over time but its all like looking at a giant mountain that you have to climb or big elephant that you have to eat. That’s the way the first day felt being the new guy on the job for the first time in 10 years. Day 2, yesterday, felt a little better. Maybe Day 3 will be even better. The job is just different. I am out of the comfort zone that I have built for myself over the last 9 ½ years of the previous 10. I am sure I felt like a complete idiot those first few months on the job back then but all that is a distant memory. This is now. This is me now.

I have to remember that I have been new at a lot of things over the past 55 years. There have been a lot of firsts. And 39 ¼ years of those firsts were without Christ as my Savior. All the first since then have been under the protection of my Lord and Savior. I must remember that the reason that I have this job is not because of my own power. It was God’s doing all the way. I must remember that in order for me to excel at this job I must begin. I must begin at the beginning that God has set forth for me. You can’t start at the middle. You can’t have the trust and experience that Pastor Rod, who I am replacing, has right now after 9 years in this position. I must walk that road myself. I must learn the lay of the land as it lays right now. I can’t come and expect to know everything and change everything immediately. I must learn how everything works as it works right now before I can figure out if there is anything that needs changing. I must first understand everything as it operates right now. And that is going to take some doing. Have you ever gone from feeling like you are one smart dude to like a really dumb dude all within a week?

If this was all my doing, I would not even be here. It was after all God that coordinated all this. It may not seem like it right now as I have waded my way into the muddy waters of the early part of a new job. It may feel like oh crap what I have got myself into. It may feel like that this was the dumbest decision ever. If it was all my doing, that would be the feeling totally at the moment. I have stepped onto the battlefield and I don’t know the armor that I have been handed. I am like David trying to figure out if he can work with the armor that he was given. It’s all new and foreign to me. If I was doing this all under my own power, like I said, I would not even be here. I would still be in my comfort zone back in Lyman where it’s 60 degrees right now (while here it is 21 degrees). I would still be at Fujikura America, Inc. and still be giving of my time to LifeSong as their chief finance guy on the side. I would still be making the good money and I would still be well-connected in our church and our community. I would not be here.

But I am here and it’s all new and scary but I do have the trust of knowing that God orchestrated all this and I should not be making rash judgments after only 2 days on the job. It is a big and scary thing to take on a new job in any field. It is an even bigger and scarier thing to take on a new job and new career (as primarily a pastor first and a secondarily an accountant). Do I see the giant and want to run? Or do I see this thing through God’s eyes? With that idea of having a giant in your path, Let’s read this passage, 1 Samuel 17:12-51a, one more time, now:

12 Now David was the son of a man named Jesse, an Ephrathite from Bethlehem in the land of Judah. Jesse was an old man at that time, and he had eight sons. 13 Jesse’s three oldest sons—Eliab, Abinadab, and Shimea[a]—had already joined Saul’s army to fight the Philistines. 14 David was the youngest son. David’s three oldest brothers stayed with Saul’s army, 15 but David went back and forth so he could help his father with the sheep in Bethlehem.

16 For forty days, every morning and evening, the Philistine champion strutted in front of the Israelite army.

17 One day Jesse said to David, “Take this basket[b] of roasted grain and these ten loaves of bread, and carry them quickly to your brothers. 18 And give these ten cuts of cheese to their captain. See how your brothers are getting along, and bring back a report on how they are doing.[c]” 19 David’s brothers were with Saul and the Israelite army at the valley of Elah, fighting against the Philistines.

20 So David left the sheep with another shepherd and set out early the next morning with the gifts, as Jesse had directed him. He arrived at the camp just as the Israelite army was leaving for the battlefield with shouts and battle cries. 21 Soon the Israelite and Philistine forces stood facing each other, army against army. 22 David left his things with the keeper of supplies and hurried out to the ranks to greet his brothers. 23 As he was talking with them, Goliath, the Philistine champion from Gath, came out from the Philistine ranks. Then David heard him shout his usual taunt to the army of Israel.

24 As soon as the Israelite army saw him, they began to run away in fright. 25 “Have you seen the giant?” the men asked. “He comes out each day to defy Israel. The king has offered a huge reward to anyone who kills him. He will give that man one of his daughters for a wife, and the man’s entire family will be exempted from paying taxes!”

26 David asked the soldiers standing nearby, “What will a man get for killing this Philistine and ending his defiance of Israel? Who is this pagan Philistine anyway, that he is allowed to defy the armies of the living God?”

27 And these men gave David the same reply. They said, “Yes, that is the reward for killing him.”

28 But when David’s oldest brother, Eliab, heard David talking to the men, he was angry. “What are you doing around here anyway?” he demanded. “What about those few sheep you’re supposed to be taking care of? I know about your pride and deceit. You just want to see the battle!”

29 “What have I done now?” David replied. “I was only asking a question!” 30 He walked over to some others and asked them the same thing and received the same answer. 31 Then David’s question was reported to King Saul, and the king sent for him.
32 “Don’t worry about this Philistine,” David told Saul. “I’ll go fight him!”

33 “Don’t be ridiculous!” Saul replied. “There’s no way you can fight this Philistine and possibly win! You’re only a boy, and he’s been a man of war since his youth.”

34 But David persisted. “I have been taking care of my father’s sheep and goats,” he said. “When a lion or a bear comes to steal a lamb from the flock, 35 I go after it with a club and rescue the lamb from its mouth. If the animal turns on me, I catch it by the jaw and club it to death. 36 I have done this to both lions and bears, and I’ll do it to this pagan Philistine, too, for he has defied the armies of the living God! 37 The Lord who rescued me from the claws of the lion and the bear will rescue me from this Philistine!”

Saul finally consented. “All right, go ahead,” he said. “And may the Lord be with you!”

38 Then Saul gave David his own armor—a bronze helmet and a coat of mail. 39 David put it on, strapped the sword over it, and took a step or two to see what it was like, for he had never worn such things before.

“I can’t go in these,” he protested to Saul. “I’m not used to them.” So David took them off again. 40 He picked up five smooth stones from a stream and put them into his shepherd’s bag. Then, armed only with his shepherd’s staff and sling, he started across the valley to fight the Philistine.

41 Goliath walked out toward David with his shield bearer ahead of him, 42 sneering in contempt at this ruddy-faced boy. 43 “Am I a dog,” he roared at David, “that you come at me with a stick?” And he cursed David by the names of his gods. 44 “Come over here, and I’ll give your flesh to the birds and wild animals!” Goliath yelled.

45 David replied to the Philistine, “You come to me with sword, spear, and javelin, but I come to you in the name of the Lord of Heaven’s Armies—the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. 46 Today the Lord will conquer you, and I will kill you and cut off your head. And then I will give the dead bodies of your men to the birds and wild animals, and the whole world will know that there is a God in Israel! 47 And everyone assembled here will know that the Lord rescues his people, but not with sword and spear. This is the Lord’s battle, and he will give you to us!”

48 As Goliath moved closer to attack, David quickly ran out to meet him. 49 Reaching into his shepherd’s bag and taking out a stone, he hurled it with his sling and hit the Philistine in the forehead. The stone sank in, and Goliath stumbled and fell face down on the ground.

50 So David triumphed over the Philistine with only a sling and a stone, for he had no sword. 51 Then David ran over and pulled Goliath’s sword from its sheath. David used it to kill him and cut off his head.

In this passage, we see what a difference perspective makes. Most of the onlookers saw a giant. David saw a mortal man defying the almighty God. Goliath was too big a target to miss. David knew that he would not be alone when he faced Goliath. God would be there with him in the fight. He looked at the situation from God’s perspective. Who or what are the “giants” in your life? Viewing impossible situations from God’s point of view helps us put giant problems into perspective. Once we see clearly, we can fight more effectively.

The thing about slaying giants or eating elephants is that they both begin with the first step or the first bite. I know that I could easily turn and run because the giant out there seems so big right now. But, I must remember that God brought me here to this fight. He wanted me in this fight in this place in this time working with these people in this fight. There is something that God has in store. I cannot see it for the giant in my path right now but I must endure. I must trust that God will reveal. I must trust that God will make my path clear. He will make me feel more confident as the days progress. He will make one day wonder why I was so scared way back in February of 2018. One day this job will be second nature to me just as my previous job became. I must remember that God brought me here and he will bring me through it.
It is so easy at the beginning of a journey that God has set you on to turn and run and say that you cannot do it. He puts us through trials to make us more dependent on Him. He allows things to happen to us that throw our confidence in ourselves out the window so that we will find our confidence in Him. What giants are you facing? Trust in the One who brought you to the battlefield. He will show you how to slay the giant. It begins with the first step – trust in Him.

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 17:12-51a
David Kills Goliath

I don’t know why this came to mind this morning and, man, I had not even thought about this event in my life in years and most likely have not written about it in this space ever. Back when I was a rising junior at Travelers Rest High School (TRHS) at the tail end of my sophomore, it was time for the class officer elections. You know, right at the end of the current school year you vote on next year’s class officers. One of the most popular kids at school from my class was a guy by the name of Robin Griffith. He was a shortish guy. I was actually about maybe an inch taller than he and there’s not too many guys that I am taller than.

He was kind of like Bill Clinton as a politician though. He was good looking. Had a way with words. Had a way with the girls. Said all the right things. Did all the popular things. But there was no plan. One of the things that the junior class president was in charge of each year was to manage the fund raising process for the junior-senior prom. That was the one big thing that you did as the junior class president. Success or failure of the prom road on your shoulders as junior class president. It is the junior class that pays for the prom as a way to honor the seniors. So, it’s kind of big deal. The whole school will be watching how your class pulls this off. It will be remembered long after graduation.

But Robin was kind of like Donald Trump with regard to the junior class elections. He ran because he wanted to win the race. He wanted to see how popular he was. He wanted to get the ego massage that was the election. He had no plan of what he was going to do with the office after he got it. Well, you know me, I am a sucker for a challenge. Although I had only been living in Travelers for two school years by the end of my sophomore year in high school, I had become mildly popular myself. A lot of people knew who I was, just not as many as knew lifelong TR resident, Robin Griffith. I had friends, particularly the previous junior class president, who said I should run against Robin because that previous president knew Robin’s style and knew he would screw up the prom. So, after encouragement from others in addition to the previous junior class president, I signed up to run for junior class president.

There were several weeks of campaigning with 8 ½ by 11 posters (all that was allowed) plastered at key walking intersections in the buildings of TRHS. Talking to people. Shaking hands (late 70’s style). Kissin’ babies…no, there was no baby kissin’! All the usual candidate stuff. It all led up to the day before the class elections when we had the assembly for class officer candidate speeches. Of course, my speech was very meticulous and I had a plan of how we were going to more than raise enough funds to finance the junior-senior prom. Then, Robin gets up mocks me for being so meticulous and him being the great off the cuff speaker he was proceeded to whip the crowd up with great promises but no plan. He has no plan but yet he mocked me for having one.

I would like to tell you that I won that election. But the outgoing junior class president (each outgoing class officers were responsible for counting the votes for their replacements) told me later than in this two candidate race, I lost the election by 6 votes. Since there were only two candidates, there would be no run-off election. He won. I lost. That was it.

With that idea of me having a plan and being mocked for it in mind, Let’s read this passage, 1 Samuel 17:12-51a, one more time, now:

12 Now David was the son of a man named Jesse, an Ephrathite from Bethlehem in the land of Judah. Jesse was an old man at that time, and he had eight sons. 13 Jesse’s three oldest sons—Eliab, Abinadab, and Shimea[a]—had already joined Saul’s army to fight the Philistines. 14 David was the youngest son. David’s three oldest brothers stayed with Saul’s army, 15 but David went back and forth so he could help his father with the sheep in Bethlehem.

16 For forty days, every morning and evening, the Philistine champion strutted in front of the Israelite army.

17 One day Jesse said to David, “Take this basket[b] of roasted grain and these ten loaves of bread, and carry them quickly to your brothers. 18 And give these ten cuts of cheese to their captain. See how your brothers are getting along, and bring back a report on how they are doing.[c]” 19 David’s brothers were with Saul and the Israelite army at the valley of Elah, fighting against the Philistines.

20 So David left the sheep with another shepherd and set out early the next morning with the gifts, as Jesse had directed him. He arrived at the camp just as the Israelite army was leaving for the battlefield with shouts and battle cries. 21 Soon the Israelite and Philistine forces stood facing each other, army against army. 22 David left his things with the keeper of supplies and hurried out to the ranks to greet his brothers. 23 As he was talking with them, Goliath, the Philistine champion from Gath, came out from the Philistine ranks. Then David heard him shout his usual taunt to the army of Israel.

24 As soon as the Israelite army saw him, they began to run away in fright. 25 “Have you seen the giant?” the men asked. “He comes out each day to defy Israel. The king has offered a huge reward to anyone who kills him. He will give that man one of his daughters for a wife, and the man’s entire family will be exempted from paying taxes!”

26 David asked the soldiers standing nearby, “What will a man get for killing this Philistine and ending his defiance of Israel? Who is this pagan Philistine anyway, that he is allowed to defy the armies of the living God?”

27 And these men gave David the same reply. They said, “Yes, that is the reward for killing him.”

28 But when David’s oldest brother, Eliab, heard David talking to the men, he was angry. “What are you doing around here anyway?” he demanded. “What about those few sheep you’re supposed to be taking care of? I know about your pride and deceit. You just want to see the battle!”

29 “What have I done now?” David replied. “I was only asking a question!” 30 He walked over to some others and asked them the same thing and received the same answer. 31 Then David’s question was reported to King Saul, and the king sent for him.
32 “Don’t worry about this Philistine,” David told Saul. “I’ll go fight him!”

33 “Don’t be ridiculous!” Saul replied. “There’s no way you can fight this Philistine and possibly win! You’re only a boy, and he’s been a man of war since his youth.”

34 But David persisted. “I have been taking care of my father’s sheep and goats,” he said. “When a lion or a bear comes to steal a lamb from the flock, 35 I go after it with a club and rescue the lamb from its mouth. If the animal turns on me, I catch it by the jaw and club it to death. 36 I have done this to both lions and bears, and I’ll do it to this pagan Philistine, too, for he has defied the armies of the living God! 37 The Lord who rescued me from the claws of the lion and the bear will rescue me from this Philistine!”

Saul finally consented. “All right, go ahead,” he said. “And may the Lord be with you!”

38 Then Saul gave David his own armor—a bronze helmet and a coat of mail. 39 David put it on, strapped the sword over it, and took a step or two to see what it was like, for he had never worn such things before.

“I can’t go in these,” he protested to Saul. “I’m not used to them.” So David took them off again. 40 He picked up five smooth stones from a stream and put them into his shepherd’s bag. Then, armed only with his shepherd’s staff and sling, he started across the valley to fight the Philistine.

41 Goliath walked out toward David with his shield bearer ahead of him, 42 sneering in contempt at this ruddy-faced boy. 43 “Am I a dog,” he roared at David, “that you come at me with a stick?” And he cursed David by the names of his gods. 44 “Come over here, and I’ll give your flesh to the birds and wild animals!” Goliath yelled.

45 David replied to the Philistine, “You come to me with sword, spear, and javelin, but I come to you in the name of the Lord of Heaven’s Armies—the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. 46 Today the Lord will conquer you, and I will kill you and cut off your head. And then I will give the dead bodies of your men to the birds and wild animals, and the whole world will know that there is a God in Israel! 47 And everyone assembled here will know that the Lord rescues his people, but not with sword and spear. This is the Lord’s battle, and he will give you to us!”

48 As Goliath moved closer to attack, David quickly ran out to meet him. 49 Reaching into his shepherd’s bag and taking out a stone, he hurled it with his sling and hit the Philistine in the forehead. The stone sank in, and Goliath stumbled and fell face down on the ground.

50 So David triumphed over the Philistine with only a sling and a stone, for he had no sword. 51 Then David ran over and pulled Goliath’s sword from its sheath. David used it to kill him and cut off his head.

In this passage, we see that criticism could not stop David. While the rest of the army stood around, he knew the importance of taking action. With God to fight for him, there was no reason to wait. David older brother criticized him for asking questions as to why no one was taking any action even though there was a reward. People may try to discourage you with negative comments or mockery, but continue to do what you know is right, you will be pleasing God, and it is His opinion that matters most.

And then when you look back at my junior class president candidacy, Robin and his cronies mocked me up one side and down the other because they wanted to portray me as some uptight dude that was no fun. And that he was the fun candidate. And that was what played well with the electorate of 15-16 year olds in high school. Do you want a candidate that is fun and stands for nothing or do you want a guy that maybe a little anal but has a plan for what he wants to accomplish?

And of course you know what happened, yes? You are right. With Robin at the helm. Fund raising was a haphazard and not very good. Sure, he was the fun candidate but he was a horrible junior class president. The previous two proms before the one we had to put on as a class were two of the best proms the school had ever scene. With the 1979 prom was the worst. We had the prom in the old ballroom the then closed down and ready to be condemned Poinsett Hotel. It was once a grand hotel and a wonderful place to have galas and important events. It is once again that since the reclamation of the hotel by the Westin Hotel group but that was more than two decades after our prom. The hotel had been in disrepair for years by 1978 and had just been shut down as an operating facility that year. The prom was horrible. There were fights because of cramped quarters. Photography was bad because of bad lighting. The food and snacks offerings were cheap. The band was not even close to being memorable. Can’t even remember a single song they played.

That was high school and in the end it doesn’t really matter whether the prom was good or not. In real life, people may mock you for doing the right thing. They may mock you for having a plan to do the right things. They may make fun of you for being a Christian. They may make fun of you for dropping everything and going into the ministry. They may ridicule you for following God’s calling on your life. But hey, stick to the plan. Who are you trying to please? God or other people? Let’s stick with trying to please God! He’s got the ultimate plan and it wins in the end. He’s got the best prom EVER waiting on us in eternity. He’s got the plan. Let’s follow Him rather than the worldly ones who promises are like vapor.

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 17:12-51a (Part 1 of 3)
David Kills Goliath

After two days of travel, we are finally in Moline, IL. We were so tired last night after unloading the cars and carrying all the stuff that we had put in the cars that we knew we would need immediately up 2 flights of stairs (I must have done that 35 times at least) that we feel asleep watching TV on the floor after the cable guy left. Then we got up and went to bed about 9:30pm Central Time. It’s been a long two days getting here. So, we were kinda tired. More tired than even we thought we were.

Since our personal belonging moved by the moving company will not be here until Tuesday morning, we are roughing it. Kind of ill prepared I guess you say. We are sleeping on an air mattress and making do with what we could fit in the two cars. We are not fully ready one might think for what is ahead of us in the new journey in our lives. We don’t have our couches, love seats, coffee creamer, our beloved mattress and box brings, more than half of our clothes, kitchen table, all the little things that you don’t notice. But cumulatively, they add up to the creature comforts of home, as generally accepted in modern American culture. However, we must press forward. We are not fully equipped from an outward standpoint. But the battle begins today. Tomorrow may be my first day in the office but today is my first day as a pastor of this church. We may not have all the equipment we need. We may come to the battlefield in what clothes we have available. This will be a new thing today. Not only stepping into a new job but a new church all together. I feel so ill equipped for both of those things. It’s been a decade since I had to learn a new job. It’s been 7 ½ years since I had to learn a new church. It’s been 7 years since I had to use GPS just to find the nearest grocery store. I have never been in a place where a snowstorm for “a quick 1-2 inches” didn’t bring the society to a halt and the local news going all “Snow Central 2018” with crawlers at the bottom of the screen about all the cancellations. Here’s its just a quick one to two inches. No big deal. As I stare out at the snow on tops of the houses in the neighborhood next door to the apartment complex and the 17 degrees Fahrenheit temperature outside, I am a Southern boy in a strange land. I feel inadequately prepared for the weather, for the job, for the changes in my life, for the significantly reduced income. I feel like, at this moment, am I ready for this and well it’s too late now you done gone and done it now. No turning back. You are like the person shoved out on stage to make up for an act that didn’t show up. Well you are out there. Now whatcha gonna do. The spotlight is on. The change has happened. It is no longer conceptual. This is real. This is my life now.

That’s kind of feeling of being ill-prepared for the battle and having fear inside is what I thought of this morning as I read through this passage, 1 Samuel 17:12-51a, this morning for a second time. I am sure that David may have felt those same feelings when he stepped onto the battlefield with Goliath. We known that David won this battle and that he trusted in the Lord, but he would not be human if he felt “oh crap, man I have gone and done it now” when he stepped onto the field with Goliath. Let’s read the passage with that idea of feeling inadequate for the task at hand in mind as we read it now:

12 Now David was the son of a man named Jesse, an Ephrathite from Bethlehem in the land of Judah. Jesse was an old man at that time, and he had eight sons. 13 Jesse’s three oldest sons—Eliab, Abinadab, and Shimea[a]—had already joined Saul’s army to fight the Philistines. 14 David was the youngest son. David’s three oldest brothers stayed with Saul’s army, 15 but David went back and forth so he could help his father with the sheep in Bethlehem.

16 For forty days, every morning and evening, the Philistine champion strutted in front of the Israelite army.

17 One day Jesse said to David, “Take this basket[b] of roasted grain and these ten loaves of bread, and carry them quickly to your brothers. 18 And give these ten cuts of cheese to their captain. See how your brothers are getting along, and bring back a report on how they are doing.[c]” 19 David’s brothers were with Saul and the Israelite army at the valley of Elah, fighting against the Philistines.

20 So David left the sheep with another shepherd and set out early the next morning with the gifts, as Jesse had directed him. He arrived at the camp just as the Israelite army was leaving for the battlefield with shouts and battle cries. 21 Soon the Israelite and Philistine forces stood facing each other, army against army. 22 David left his things with the keeper of supplies and hurried out to the ranks to greet his brothers. 23 As he was talking with them, Goliath, the Philistine champion from Gath, came out from the Philistine ranks. Then David heard him shout his usual taunt to the army of Israel.

24 As soon as the Israelite army saw him, they began to run away in fright. 25 “Have you seen the giant?” the men asked. “He comes out each day to defy Israel. The king has offered a huge reward to anyone who kills him. He will give that man one of his daughters for a wife, and the man’s entire family will be exempted from paying taxes!”

26 David asked the soldiers standing nearby, “What will a man get for killing this Philistine and ending his defiance of Israel? Who is this pagan Philistine anyway, that he is allowed to defy the armies of the living God?”

27 And these men gave David the same reply. They said, “Yes, that is the reward for killing him.”

28 But when David’s oldest brother, Eliab, heard David talking to the men, he was angry. “What are you doing around here anyway?” he demanded. “What about those few sheep you’re supposed to be taking care of? I know about your pride and deceit. You just want to see the battle!”

29 “What have I done now?” David replied. “I was only asking a question!” 30 He walked over to some others and asked them the same thing and received the same answer. 31 Then David’s question was reported to King Saul, and the king sent for him.
32 “Don’t worry about this Philistine,” David told Saul. “I’ll go fight him!”

33 “Don’t be ridiculous!” Saul replied. “There’s no way you can fight this Philistine and possibly win! You’re only a boy, and he’s been a man of war since his youth.”

34 But David persisted. “I have been taking care of my father’s sheep and goats,” he said. “When a lion or a bear comes to steal a lamb from the flock, 35 I go after it with a club and rescue the lamb from its mouth. If the animal turns on me, I catch it by the jaw and club it to death. 36 I have done this to both lions and bears, and I’ll do it to this pagan Philistine, too, for he has defied the armies of the living God! 37 The Lord who rescued me from the claws of the lion and the bear will rescue me from this Philistine!”

Saul finally consented. “All right, go ahead,” he said. “And may the Lord be with you!”

38 Then Saul gave David his own armor—a bronze helmet and a coat of mail. 39 David put it on, strapped the sword over it, and took a step or two to see what it was like, for he had never worn such things before.

“I can’t go in these,” he protested to Saul. “I’m not used to them.” So David took them off again. 40 He picked up five smooth stones from a stream and put them into his shepherd’s bag. Then, armed only with his shepherd’s staff and sling, he started across the valley to fight the Philistine.

41 Goliath walked out toward David with his shield bearer ahead of him, 42 sneering in contempt at this ruddy-faced boy. 43 “Am I a dog,” he roared at David, “that you come at me with a stick?” And he cursed David by the names of his gods. 44 “Come over here, and I’ll give your flesh to the birds and wild animals!” Goliath yelled.

45 David replied to the Philistine, “You come to me with sword, spear, and javelin, but I come to you in the name of the Lord of Heaven’s Armies—the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. 46 Today the Lord will conquer you, and I will kill you and cut off your head. And then I will give the dead bodies of your men to the birds and wild animals, and the whole world will know that there is a God in Israel! 47 And everyone assembled here will know that the Lord rescues his people, but not with sword and spear. This is the Lord’s battle, and he will give you to us!”

48 As Goliath moved closer to attack, David quickly ran out to meet him. 49 Reaching into his shepherd’s bag and taking out a stone, he hurled it with his sling and hit the Philistine in the forehead. The stone sank in, and Goliath stumbled and fell face down on the ground.

50 So David triumphed over the Philistine with only a sling and a stone, for he had no sword. 51 Then David ran over and pulled Goliath’s sword from its sheath. David used it to kill him and cut off his head.

In this passage, we see that David was able to move faster than Goliath because David carried no heavy weapons or armor. David was an expert marksman with a sling, and as he advanced on Goliath, he stayed out of range of Goliath’s huge weapons. What made David effective was more than his ability with a sling, it was his courage and his faith in God. To fight like David, we need David’s kind of fearlessness. David’s confident trust in God had grown strong in his encounters with wild animals while guarding his father’s sheep (1 Samuel 17:34-37). When you face towering problems or new situations that seem overwhelming or fear of the unknown is crippling you, recall how God helped David and how He has helped you in the past. Take heart because God will give you strength. Use the skills God has already given you, place your trust in Him completely to carry you through the problem, the hardship, the new situation, the unknown situation and then just move forward in that trust.

David must have had fear but his trust in the Lord was greater than his fear. He moved forward into the moment that he felt unprepared for because he knew that the Lord would protect him. He knew that whatever the outcome, God would be there for him and provide him his eternal reward in heaven if he died, or God would show him how to make the best of the new situation. It is comforting in our fears to remember that God has a purpose in whatever the outcome may be. Even if we die in the process, we get to go to heaven, man! However, if God chooses not to send us to our eternal glory just yet, He will provide for us and that even the defeats have a purpose and plan in our lives. Even if things don’t turn out like we want them to, God has got this. There is a natural tendency to expect disaster when you make a change. But on the other hand, God may just blow this thing up and make the change we made to make something great for the kingdom. Who knows? Through God’s guidance and if we stay in alignment with him, he could use us here to something awesome for the kingdom. Who knows? He does! Regardless of how inadequate we may feel this week and particularly these first two days or so, God’s prepared us. God’s got this and we got press forward onto the battlefield and take on Goliath – Goliath being the great unknown that we enter into now.

Amen and Amen.