1 Samuel 1:9-18 (Part 2) – Be Careful What You Pray For! You Just Might Get It!

Posted: November 8, 2017 in Book of 1 Samuel
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1 Samuel 1:9-18 (Part 2 of 3)
Hannah’s Prayer for a Son

If you were alive back in the late 70’s to mid-80’s, there was a show called Fantasy Island, starring Ricardo Motalban. Fantasy Island was a unique resort in the Pacific Ocean, where there was very little that the mysterious overseer, Mr. Roarke (played by Ricardo Motalban), could not provide. Visitors could experience adventures that should be impossible, but this island could deliver. However, what actually happened was often far more than they expected as they faced challenges that test their character in ways they never imagined. “Da plane, da plane!” was the famous line uttered by vertically challenged Herve Villachase in his role as “Tattoo”, Mr. Roake’s little assistant. The plane he was talking about, of course, was the one that was delivering new arrivals to the island, each of whom had lain down a sizable sum of money to have his or her personal fantasies fulfilled. Mr. Roarke would take it upon himself to greet every guest as they stepped onto the island and then describes to Tattoo the nature of their fantasy request. Of course, being a supernaturally-powered mentor, Mr. Roarke very rarely allowed his guests’ fantasies to play out in the way they expected them to.

And quite often the fantasies themselves were used to teach each guest an important moral — one intended to open their eyes to some facet of their own lives they might have been neglecting. Or to teach them to appreciate what they have. Or just simply, to be careful what you wish for. But rather often, everybody just had a good time, even if it wasn’t what they were expecting. It was predictable formula each week even though the characters and the fantasies that they wished to live out were different, the pattern was the same. During the first half of the show, the guest characters would be living out their fantasy and it was working for them. It would be great. During the second 30 minutes of the show, things would start going wrong with the fantasy and the guest character would complain to Roarke how the fantasy was not at all what they were expecting. Then, in that moment, Roarke would teach some moral lesson to the guest character based on the experience. By show’s end, the guest character had come to terms with the way the fantasy played out and the lesson that they learned from it. Everybody was happy. Got back on the plane and went home. Each changed in some way by their experience on Fantasy Island.

We all have fantasies of what life would be like if we just had the opportunity to do something. For example, here in the last few blogs, I have been lamenting the lack of God’s action on His calling on my life to be in full-time ministry. Maybe, I should go to Fantasy Island and have Mr. Roarke show me what it would be like. Maybe, I would find out that it is more than I bargained for. Maybe, even though I am aware of all the unique pressures of being a pastor, as I have been close to the pastorate most of my life, it is a whole different thing to live it out. In my Fantasy Island adventure, maybe Mr. Roarke would design to expose my ability to deal with the pressures of being a full-time vocational pastor. Maybe, Mr. Roarke would put me through the paces of being a full-time pastor. I read something once about a job description for a pastor that said it was a job description fit only for Superman. It said,

“A pastor is expected to make house calls as willingly as yesterday’s country doctor, to shake hands and smile like a politician on the campaign trail, to entertain like a stand-up comedian, to teach the Scriptures like a theology professor, and to counsel like a psychologist with the wisdom of Solomon. He should run the church like a top-level business executive, handle finances like a career accountant, and deal with the public like an expert diplomat at the United Nations. No wonder so many pastors are confused about just what is expected of them and how they will ever manage to live up to all those expectations. – excerpt Frank Minirth and others, What They Didn’t Teach You in Seminary (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1993), 165.

Maybe, Mr. Roarke would arrange events during my fantasy that would expose cracks in my moral fiber, and my ability to make good moral choices. Maybe, he would expose areas of my life where I am not spiritually as mature as I will need to be as a pastor. Maybe, he will arrange things to show me that I am just not ready yet. As well, maybe he will show me what my true ministry calling will be – maybe its not as a pulpit pastor. Maybe, it is as teaching pastor such as a discipleship pastor. Maybe, it is as a teacher in a seminary. Or maybe it will confirm that God is readying me for just that right group of people in the right place at the right time at the right church that either exists or will be planted by me. Maybe, during my trip to Fantasy Island, I will learn who that people group is and will set me on fire to seek them out.

That’s what I thought of this morning – being careful what we pray for and being careful about demanding things from God in prayer. Let’s read this passage, 1 Samuel 1:9-18, once again, now:

9 Once after a sacrificial meal at Shiloh, Hannah got up and went to pray. Eli the priest was sitting at his customary place beside the entrance of the Tabernacle.[a] 10 Hannah was in deep anguish, crying bitterly as she prayed to the Lord. 11 And she made this vow: “O Lord of Heaven’s Armies, if you will look upon my sorrow and answer my prayer and give me a son, then I will give him back to you. He will be yours for his entire lifetime, and as a sign that he has been dedicated to the Lord, his hair will never be cut.[b]”

12 As she was praying to the Lord, Eli watched her. 13 Seeing her lips moving but hearing no sound, he thought she had been drinking. 14 “Must you come here drunk?” he demanded. “Throw away your wine!”

15 “Oh no, sir!” she replied. “I haven’t been drinking wine or anything stronger. But I am very discouraged, and I was pouring out my heart to the Lord. 16 Don’t think I am a wicked woman! For I have been praying out of great anguish and sorrow.”

17 “In that case,” Eli said, “go in peace! May the God of Israel grant the request you have asked of him.”

18 “Oh, thank you, sir!” she exclaimed. Then she went back and began to eat again, and she was no longer sad.

In this passage, we see that we must be careful what we promise God in prayer because He may just take you up on it! Hannah so desperately wanted a child that she was willing to strike a bargain with God. God took her up on her promise, and to Hannah’s credit, she did her part, even though it was painful (see 1 Samuel 1:27-28). Although we are not in a position to bargain or barter with God, He may still choose to answer a prayer that has an attached promise. When you pray, ask yourself “will I follow through on this promise that I made to God if He grants my request?” It is dishonest and dangerous to ignore a promise, especially to God. God keeps His promises and so should we.

This episode in Hannah’s life reminds us that we must have trust that God will shine the light on what we need to see when we are ready to see. Sometimes that is so difficult to do and we begin to bargain with God. How would you like to be Hannah. So desperate for a child and then have to later give him up to the priests at the Tabernacle. Of course this was all part of God’s plan and we see that play out in 1 Samuel – heck the book carries the name of Hannah’s son, sure fire evidence that this was part of God’s plan. But what about us. If there was ever an impatient people, it is 21st century Americans. We want what we want and we want it now. That’s our mentality. We, as Christians in America, often act the same way with God. We want him to fulfill our dream prayers immediately. Sometimes, God’s best answer to us is no response or a not yet response. Let us remember that we work on God’s timetable and not ours. Let us remember to have trust that the Creator of all things has a plan for your life and mine. It may not always play out in the exact timing or in the exact manner we envision. But we must trust the Lord. We must as limited humans trust the Eternal Creator God. We must trust in the Lord. We must trust Him even when it seems like He is not doing anything for an extended period of time. Let us trust that He is pruning us and readying us for His answer to our prayers and for the fruition of His plan for our lives. We will have our moment with God where He reveals why things turned out the way they did and we will have our eyes opened. We will then grasp why things happened the way they did and then use that live out what His plan for our lives really is. It’s not Fantasy Island. It is the real deal.

Amen and Amen.

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