1 Samuel 31:1-13
The Death of Saul (Part 4 of 5)

In my previous blog, I talked about how I remember the day of my salvation like it was yesterday. The memory of the location, the sights, the sounds, my breathing patterns, my heartbeat, the details of the play that I was attending. It is all still fresh in my mind – even now, a little over 16 years after the event. Salvation is an event, but sanctification is a process. Salvation is the beginning of a life change from the inside out. Sanctification is the hard work, the process of the Holy Spirit chiseling away that which is not of God and replacing it with that which is of God. The difference between salvation and a spiritual warm-fuzzy is that salvation is followed by a lifetime of Holy Spirit changes in our life, our outlook, our priorities that progressively makes us more and more like Christ. A spiritual warm-fuzzy, as I like to call it, is a emotion induced spiritual high (following powerful worship at church and a powerful sermon). However, in a spiritual warm fuzzy situation, there is no life change. There is no desire to chase after God. There is no ravenous appetite for God’s will. There is no desire to let go of things that are in opposition to God’s Word. You can have many spiritual warm-fuzzy experiences in life but only one day of salvation.

When I read through this passage this morning for the fourth time, that’s what struck me was the difference between spiritual warm-fuzzies and true salvation. When you bottom line 1 Samuel, you have the contrast of Samuel and Saul. Samuel must’ve had a salvation experience at a young age. His entire life was dedicated to doing God’s will. Not out of some attempt to appease God by doing the right things but rather a complete all out desire to please God and to do His will. Saul, on the other hand, had spiritual warm-fuzzy experiences throughout the history that is presented in 1 Samuel. He would have those moments where you think he finally “gets it” but then as we follow him further in the book, he just blows it and does such selfish and sometimes evil things. His actions are to satisfy his personal desires, even his so-called spiritual experiences. They were done for show or they were done in an emotional moment after it appeared that God had granted his desires. The difference between Samuel and Saul was the motivation. Because Samuel had true salvation he came at things from desiring earnestly in his heart to do God’s will whereas Saul was completely consumed with his “me-first” attitude and simply used God to validate that, if he could. His love of God was based on his outward circumstances rather than an inner love for the Lord of the Universe.

How often for us as Christ followers have we lived that way before our true salvation experience. We had spiritual warm-fuzzies galore. We may have raised our hands multiple times when a pastor asks at the end of the service who has come to Christ today. We may have gone to the altar many times to accept Christ as our Savior. Like Saul though there was no real life change. I know that was the case with me over the years before that night in December 2001. I modified my behavior for a while but would return to my old ways rather quickly just like Saul. It was not until I completely surrendered my will to that of Jesus Christ that real life change occurred. The Holy Spirit cannot enter our hearts until we open the door, really open the door in total honor and submission.

That difference between spiritual warm-fuzzies and true salvation came to mind this morning as I read through this final chapter of 1 Samuel for the fourth of five times this morning. Let’s read through 1 Samuel 31 once again now:

31 Now the Philistines attacked Israel, and the men of Israel fled before them. Many were slaughtered on the slopes of Mount Gilboa. 2 The Philistines closed in on Saul and his sons, and they killed three of his sons—Jonathan, Abinadab, and Malkishua. 3 The fighting grew very fierce around Saul, and the Philistine archers caught up with him and wounded him severely.

4 Saul groaned to his armor bearer, “Take your sword and kill me before these pagan Philistines come to run me through and taunt and torture me.”

But his armor bearer was afraid and would not do it. So Saul took his own sword and fell on it. 5 When his armor bearer realized that Saul was dead, he fell on his own sword and died beside the king. 6 So Saul, his three sons, his armor bearer, and his troops all died together that same day.

7 When the Israelites on the other side of the Jezreel Valley and beyond the Jordan saw that the Israelite army had fled and that Saul and his sons were dead, they abandoned their towns and fled. So the Philistines moved in and occupied their towns.

8 The next day, when the Philistines went out to strip the dead, they found the bodies of Saul and his three sons on Mount Gilboa. 9 So they cut off Saul’s head and stripped off his armor. Then they proclaimed the good news of Saul’s death in their pagan temple and to the people throughout the land of Philistia. 10 They placed his armor in the temple of the Ashtoreths, and they fastened his body to the wall of the city of Beth-shan.

11 But when the people of Jabesh-gilead heard what the Philistines had done to Saul, 12 all their mighty warriors traveled through the night to Beth-shan and took the bodies of Saul and his sons down from the wall. They brought them to Jabesh, where they burned the bodies. 13 Then they took their bones and buried them beneath the tamarisk tree at Jabesh, and they fasted for seven days.

In this passage, as we approach the end of our visit to the Book of 1 Samuel, we must consider the difference between the last judge of Israel and first king. Samuel, the last judge, was characterized by consistency, obedience, and a deep desire to do God’s will. He had a genuine desire for an abiding relationship with God. Saul, the first king, on the other hand, was characterized by inconsistency, disobedience, and self-will. He did not have a heart for God. When God called Samuel, he said “Speak, your servant is listening” (1 Samuel 3:10). In contrast, when God, through Samuel, called Saul, he replied “Why are you talking like this to me?” (1 Samuel 9:21). Saul was dedicated to himself. Samuel was dedicated to God.

My prayer this morning is that we all have that true moment of salvation where you come before the Lord with our hat in our hands and humbly kneel before Him knowing that we do not deserve what He has to offer. Knowing that we have made a mess of our lives. Knowing that one sin disqualifies us from heaven. Knowing that a lifetime of sins piled on top of that first one just adds to the justice of us being sent away from God to a place called hell. Knowing that we have nothing to negotiate with before a righteous God. Knowing that it is only Jesus who can snatch us from our eternal fate. We beg him to pull us out of our nightmare and our nightmarish fate. There can be no greater moment of humility than our moment of salvation. We are beggars look for a scrap from the Master’s table. It is only then that we are ready for the Holy Spirit to enter in and change us from the inside out.

We go from trying to do the right things seeking behavior modification to a soul change that desires to please God in everything we do. We go from despair to joy even in the hardest of times. We go from living like hell during the week and trying to make up for it by going to church on Sundays to a real desire to live our lives according God’s Word and to really, really want to please God. We go from “have to’s” to “want to’s”. That’s the difference between Saul and Samuel. That’s the difference between spiritual warm-fuzzies and true salvation.
Amen and Amen.

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1 Samuel 31:1-13
The Death of Saul (Part 3 of 5)

I remember my day of salvation like it was yesterday. I remember living my life before that, knowing of Jesus Christ and calling myself a Christian but not really having a relationship with Him. I was born into a preacher’s family. My dad was a preacher in the United Methodist Church, South Carolina Annual Conference, for 53 years when he retired, just a few years ago. I was raised in the church. Every time the church doors were open, I was there. Often the church or churches that my dad served over the years of my brother and me growing up were our playgrounds. We used to run around the church building playing cops and robbers, cowboys and Indians. Sometimes, since we were big Star Trek fans, the church and it’s, if it had one, educational building or wing would be our USS Enterprise. The pulpit area would be our “bridge” or control room where we would be Spock, Bones, Capt. Kirk, and so on. The rest of the church and educational wings of the buildings would become the rest of the ship. Outside the church would be our alien planets where we would be the landing party or away team. We had quite the imaginations.

Church was sometimes just next door to the parsonage. Church was our life. I guess I became numb to it because it was like the family business. So after leaving home and getting married at 18 and going to college, my faith was just nominal and certainly was not saved. I knew all about Jesus but little about the Bible. I continued to go to church after marriage but the church I went to was my first wife’s family church and it was more of a social club than it was a discipling church. There was no discipleship at all. It was just a small three main families church that got together on Sundays and had potluck dinners at the drop of hat. It was fellowship for sure but challenging anyone to go deeper in their faith, it was not. Between the liberal arts “question everything, including religion” education that I got at Furman University, it rocked my world and my belief systems. My life after that became increasingly secular. Living for the moment. Living for the weekend. Living for myself. It was not until I was in my late 30’s in December 2001 that I came to Christ.

On that night that I came to Christ, there was a play at the church that I attended at that time, Abundant Life Church (a non-denominational church) in the Berea area of Greenville, SC, that was part of the church’s lead-up to Christmas. It was a play about this guy, who happened to be named Mark in the play, who lived a party lifestyle. Even though he had kids, he was all about the party, hanging out with his buddies at the bars, and just living a very self-centered life. He was blaming everybody else for whatever hardship he had in life. He never took responsibility for anything. The irony of the main character in the play being named Mark was that the Holy Spirit made me realize that the play on stage was matching the track of MY life. It was like watching a movie of my life. I was him and he was me. In the play, a little over halfway through it, the main character got into a car accident. During the time that the main character was unconscious, he was able to see the eternity that was awaiting him. Even though he was not a believer, the reality of hell became very real. He got revisit via video the first half of the play to show how arrogant and self-centered and self-seeking that he was. Of course, he tried to argue his way out of hell but there was no disputing the facts and ultimately he falls to his knees and cries out to God to give him another chance. The guy playing the part really sold it. He was literally sobbing like a baby on stage with real tears. He finally just goes out cold again and the lights go dark. Next thing you see when the lights come back up are the EMTs on top of him jolting him back to life. After that experience in hell, the character, Mark, was a changed man. He became a Christ follower from that moment forward and restored his marriage, his relationship with his kids, and just became a true disciple. We see him turn down opportunities to go bar hopping with his old friends, turn down opportunities to be unfaithful and so on. His attitude this time around was not that he HAD to turn down these opportunities, he WANTED to.
For me, that was it. It was my moment to come face to face with who I was and where I was headed. My heart was pounding. I could hear myself breathe. I could hear my heartbeat. I knew this play was FOR me. It was about me. It was the Holy Spirit finally getting through to me about my need for a Savior. I gave my life to the Lord then and there. I was baptized the following summer in 2002.

As all Christ followers know, salvation is just the beginning of the journey. Things did not suddenly get better in my life because of salvation. In those early years after salvation, the circumstances of my life actually got worse in some ways. I would like to say that, even in the troubled times, that I continued an upward trajectory toward spiritual adulthood, but I was a spiritual baby for a long time. There were idols in my life that the Holy Spirit had to get rid of before I could begin maturing. That took a while and was painful at times. I think I really didn’t start growing up in Jesus Christ until 2009 while I was living in California and met Luke and Felisha Brower, my pastor and his wife. They became our close friends and each of them were instrumental in the growth of Elena and me. Even though they were younger than us by an average of 10 years, they grew me with hard confrontations about my faith and cherry picking what I wanted to believe. They led Elena to the cross while we were under their spiritual care. Then the growth that we had at LifeSong when we moved back to South Carolina between late 2010 and early 2018. We became leaders in the local church there. We became ravenous for Christ there. We went deeper and stronger there. Now, we are here in Illinois serving the Lord full-time and waiting to see what the Lord will do with it – with excitement, we can’t wait to see what God is going to do!

What a journey it has been since December 2001 for me. Back then, I would have laughed at you if you had told me that I would end up in Illinois and being a pastor. I would have laughed at you if you had told me that I would have a wife that was all-in for what God was calling us to do. I am amazed at what God has done in my life since salvation. When I look back on that night at that play, it was indeed the biggest decision of my life. It changed everything. Who knows where I would be now if it were not for that night. That night I realized that I needed a Savior not just behavior modification. I needed Jesus to change me from the inside out. Through the Holy Spirit, He is still working on it. I am by no means perfect now. Still a bunch of things that God has to do in me and will continue to have to do in me until the day that I am called home to heaven. Before that night in December 2001, I thought I could will myself into being a better person. I thought if I just did more good than bad then I’d be OK. That night changed all that. I needed an intercessor. I needed Jesus.

Being presented with that moment where we have to make a moral choice is what I thought of this morning as I read this passage/chapter, this final chapter of the book of 1 Samuel. That’s what I thought of this morning as we see the end of Saul’s life in 1 Samuel 31. Let’s read about it now:

31 Now the Philistines attacked Israel, and the men of Israel fled before them. Many were slaughtered on the slopes of Mount Gilboa. 2 The Philistines closed in on Saul and his sons, and they killed three of his sons—Jonathan, Abinadab, and Malkishua. 3 The fighting grew very fierce around Saul, and the Philistine archers caught up with him and wounded him severely.

4 Saul groaned to his armor bearer, “Take your sword and kill me before these pagan Philistines come to run me through and taunt and torture me.”

But his armor bearer was afraid and would not do it. So Saul took his own sword and fell on it. 5 When his armor bearer realized that Saul was dead, he fell on his own sword and died beside the king. 6 So Saul, his three sons, his armor bearer, and his troops all died together that same day.

7 When the Israelites on the other side of the Jezreel Valley and beyond the Jordan saw that the Israelite army had fled and that Saul and his sons were dead, they abandoned their towns and fled. So the Philistines moved in and occupied their towns.

8 The next day, when the Philistines went out to strip the dead, they found the bodies of Saul and his three sons on Mount Gilboa. 9 So they cut off Saul’s head and stripped off his armor. Then they proclaimed the good news of Saul’s death in their pagan temple and to the people throughout the land of Philistia. 10 They placed his armor in the temple of the Ashtoreths, and they fastened his body to the wall of the city of Beth-shan.

11 But when the people of Jabesh-gilead heard what the Philistines had done to Saul, 12 all their mighty warriors traveled through the night to Beth-shan and took the bodies of Saul and his sons down from the wall. They brought them to Jabesh, where they burned the bodies. 13 Then they took their bones and buried them beneath the tamarisk tree at Jabesh, and they fasted for seven days.

In this passage, we see that Saul hasn’t changed a bit. Saul is being that Saul that he has always been throughout the book of 1 Samuel – always taking matters into his own hands without thinking of God or asking for His guidance. Even with regard to his death, Saul responded the same way he responded to things during his life. Often we think we will change how we act later, always later in life rather than now. None of us knows when our end is going to come. Why do we think we have time to change our ways? We will get our act together and then we will come to Christ … later. Saul did not change even at the end.

Are you the character in the play? Are you living for yourself and for your selfish desires and not caring about how you impact others or about your eternal destiny? Do you think you’ve got time? Do you think that you’ve got time to get right later? Are you of the mind that you have to give up something to become a Christ follower and you are not willing to do that yet? Those were all yes answers for me at one time in my life. Later. Later. Later. The play that night showed me that we are not guaranteed anything in this life. We have no guarantee of later. The time is now. The urgency is now. You need Jesus now. Don’t wait til later! Your eternity is now. Don’t be like me and wait til you are almost 40 years old to come to Jesus. What you are living for now is a hopeless search for something to fill the hole in your soul that only God can fill and the hole was only designed for Him! Don’t waste any more time. The time is now. Eternity is now. Tomorrow may be too late.

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 31:1-13
The Death of Saul (Part 2 of 5)

On my favorite show from the past, Friends, Phoebe wrote a song for young Emma’s first birthday, the first line of which was “Emma, you name poses a dilemma. Nothing rhymes with Emma.” That song has no deep meaning to this blog. I just love making references to Friends and the fact that in this song, Phoebe actually incorporated the word, dilemma, into the words of a song. And dilemma is certainly what we have here in this passage. A moral dilemma.

Have you ever been in a situation where you have been asked to violate a law or Christian ethical standards? Have you ever been in a situation where you had to “throw somebody under the bus” to save your own skin? Have ever been in a situation where you had to lie to keep from some negative outcome? We as Christians are faced with moral dilemmas quite often. We may face these moral crossroads on a daily basis without even thinking about it. What would you do is the age old question posed to us in classrooms or work-related roundtable discussions and so on? We often do case studies of moral failures in school. And we analyze and breakdown, in these discussions, what the moral failing was and sit there and wonder how this person could have done what he/she did. We say to ourselves, I know I would have made a different choice. I would have avoided that moral failure. I know I would have, we say to ourselves. We say to ourselves, I would have recognized that critical moment where we had to make a choice between right and wrong and made the right choice. How arrogant are we when we say such things?

We think of many reports in recent years of the moral failings of high-profile pastors of these super large megachurches. Usually, it has involved inappropriate sexual relationships outside of marriage. This type of thing is commonplace in politics where every couple of years a representative or senator is taken down by thinking that having sex with someone who is not his wife is OK. As a Christian all of these things are most troubling. As a Christian and a pastor, the moral failings of these high profile megachurch pastors are particularly troubling to the witness of Christians to the world in which we live. It also reminds me that we, too, as local pastors, even as ones who do not have national or international celebrity are not immune to such moral failures that could disqualify us from being leaders in our local churches and that could cripple us from ever being a pastor again in the future.

We must remember that as leaders and as those who have dedicated their life to serving the Lord, we have a target on our back. And it doesn’t have to be preachers. We could be a really effective Christ follower who works a regular job in the secular world but is a person known to be a Christ follower through years of living with integrity and living to share the gospel through actions and words. Each of us as Christ followers who are actively seeking to expand the Kingdom has a target on our back. Satan is coming after us. He will influence people and situations to give us choices that when making the right choice with gather no press. But when making the wrong choice can discredit and disqualify us and tear down what we may have been doing for a lifetime. Satan always attacks us in what our weak point is – presenting us with situations where we have to make a choice between right and wrong. It often starts small and Satan sees that we will waver in that small choice and then he knows he’s got a weakness in us and will hammer away at it. Sexual sin, for example, always starts with innuendos, jokes with double meanings, touches, brushes up against someone’s body, a discussion about the failings of one’s spouse, and off to the races to adultery people go. Sexual sin, sins with money, and other moral failings of us as Christ followers do not up and happen one day. They are the end of a trail of smaller moral rationalizations and failures.

With all the moral failures of late of high profile pastors of large megachurches, we as pastors of smaller, less well-known local churches should take heed and notice. What are we doing to keep ourselves from those moments of moral choice where we have the opportunity to rationalize away a wrong moral choice? Where are we weakest? We can say it will never happen to us but there are moral failures daily around the country that cause pastors to have to resign their church and sometimes even have to quit being pastors altogether. We can say it will never happen to us but it can. We can say that we would make the right choice in those situations but Satan can cloud our judgment at times even if we are long-time pastors. And those of us who are new pastors such as myself, we must learn from these situations so that we can recognize the warning signs of a moral failure being on our horizons.

Being presented with that moment where we have to make a moral choice is what I thought of this morning as I read this passage/chapter, this final chapter of the book of 1 Samuel. That’s what I thought of this morning as we see the end of Saul’s life in 1 Samuel 31. Let’s read about it now:

31 Now the Philistines attacked Israel, and the men of Israel fled before them. Many were slaughtered on the slopes of Mount Gilboa. 2 The Philistines closed in on Saul and his sons, and they killed three of his sons—Jonathan, Abinadab, and Malkishua. 3 The fighting grew very fierce around Saul, and the Philistine archers caught up with him and wounded him severely.

4 Saul groaned to his armor bearer, “Take your sword and kill me before these pagan Philistines come to run me through and taunt and torture me.”

But his armor bearer was afraid and would not do it. So Saul took his own sword and fell on it. 5 When his armor bearer realized that Saul was dead, he fell on his own sword and died beside the king. 6 So Saul, his three sons, his armor bearer, and his troops all died together that same day.

7 When the Israelites on the other side of the Jezreel Valley and beyond the Jordan saw that the Israelite army had fled and that Saul and his sons were dead, they abandoned their towns and fled. So the Philistines moved in and occupied their towns.

8 The next day, when the Philistines went out to strip the dead, they found the bodies of Saul and his three sons on Mount Gilboa. 9 So they cut off Saul’s head and stripped off his armor. Then they proclaimed the good news of Saul’s death in their pagan temple and to the people throughout the land of Philistia. 10 They placed his armor in the temple of the Ashtoreths, and they fastened his body to the wall of the city of Beth-shan.

11 But when the people of Jabesh-gilead heard what the Philistines had done to Saul, 12 all their mighty warriors traveled through the night to Beth-shan and took the bodies of Saul and his sons down from the wall. They brought them to Jabesh, where they burned the bodies. 13 Then they took their bones and buried them beneath the tamarisk tree at Jabesh, and they fasted for seven days.

In this passage, we see that Saul’s armor bearer faced a moral dilemma – should he carry out a sinful order from a man he was supposed to obey? He knew he should obey his master, the king, but he also knew that murder was wrong. He decided not to kill Saul. There is a difference between following an order that you do not agree with and following an order that you know is morally wrong. It is never right or ethical to carry out a wrong act, no matter who gives the order or no matter what the consequences of disobedience may be. Can you and I find the courage to follow God’s commands above human commands?

Maybe we are not being asked to commit murder in our roles as pastors. However, we must make similar moral choices at times as to whether to follow God’s commands and it makes no headlines. Doing the right thing often never makes headlines. However, we must always be cognizant as pastors and as Christ followers in general of our witness. It can take years to develop a reputation as person that is known to do the right thing because of being a Christ follower and can take one minute to destroy it all with a moral failure.

As Christ followers, and as pastors, let us think be aware that Satan is out for us. When we are doing nothing for Christ, Satan doesn’t care. He leaves us alone. If we are being effective for Jesus, Satan puts a target on our back. We must remember to we are sinful creatures with moral weakspots and we must seek God’s protection. Be honest with Him about where we are weak and seek His help. We must seek to steer clear of even the zip code of where we moral failures can happen and particularly those areas of morality where we are weakest and we all have a weak spot. Satan will find it and attack you there. Stay clean and close my friends. Stay close to God and pray that He helps you make the right moral choices. Satan’s coming after you. You can bank on it!

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 31:1-13
The Death of Saul (Part 1 of 5)

Isn’t it sadly funny that some of today’s most popular personalities are “reality” television show stars. The only reason that they are celebrities is because some producer decided it would be interesting to follow their lives. And the so called reality of their lives, often much of which is staged, is what has made them stars. They have no talent to speak of to make them worthy of stardom on their own. They just happen to have their lives exposed on television. Many of these reality show stars have parlayed their instant fame into wealth. One of the families that fall into this genre of instantly famous reality show celebrities is the Kardashians. We, as the American television audience, seem to be fascinated by the lives and exploits of sisters, sisters Kim, Kourtney, Khloe, Kendall and Kylie. Kim, in particular, has become an major celebrity. All five of these girls are indeed beautiful women. However, none of them have a lick of marketable talents outside their physical beauty. However, we have as collective TV viewers become so interested in their lives that their “show” has been on the air for fourteen seasons now. Can you believe that?

They used to call the show, Seinfeld, “the show about nothing!” It was a tongue-in-cheek homage to the fact that the show would create these wildly funny episodes that would start out about this trivial things that grew into these major things by the end of the show. It was witty and funny and the actors were very talented at their craft. However, Keeping Up With the Kardashians is truly a show about nothing. The shows are about gossip, clothes, boys, sex, and showing off the bodies of the Kardashian girls. That’s it. That’s all. We have now a whole generation of girls that have grown up watching the Kardashian girls parlayed meaningless, vapid, mindless girls who use their sexuality to get what they want. It’s all about the next party and whose doing it with who. It is worse by far than the worst episode of the worst show ever, Three’s Company, back in the 1970s. Kim Kardashian is the most famous of the sisters because she has created this celebrity aura about herself that has gotten her into relationships and marriages with several major musical artists or athletes. It is amazing to me that we as a country of television viewers actually care about this. To live in a society that objects to objectify women for their sexuality, these girls, and particularly Kim, glory in it. But the bottom line to it all is that the Kardashian girls are celebrities because of television. They have nothing to offer. They have no talent. They are not seeking to stamp out social injustice. They are not innately funny. They do not provide us with satire or social commentary. They are not even good actors. But yet they are valued by our society because they are on TV and they look good and that is it. No other reason. They revel in their immorality and sexuality plastered all over our television screens. And to top it off, they off screen lives are now deemed important by celebrity magazines. It makes you want to scream…why? We are a nation enthralled with celebrities. We have even made one our President.

We seem as a nation to care more about style than substance. We care more about Kim Kardashian than we do about the education of our children. We care more about Snookie on Jersey Shores than we do about crime in Jersey City. We care about style than things that matter. That’s what I thought of this morning as we see the end of Saul’s life in 1 Samuel 31. Let’s read about it now:

 

31 Now the Philistines attacked Israel, and the men of Israel fled before them. Many were slaughtered on the slopes of Mount Gilboa. 2 The Philistines closed in on Saul and his sons, and they killed three of his sons—Jonathan, Abinadab, and Malkishua. 3 The fighting grew very fierce around Saul, and the Philistine archers caught up with him and wounded him severely.

4 Saul groaned to his armor bearer, “Take your sword and kill me before these pagan Philistines come to run me through and taunt and torture me.”

But his armor bearer was afraid and would not do it. So Saul took his own sword and fell on it. 5 When his armor bearer realized that Saul was dead, he fell on his own sword and died beside the king. 6 So Saul, his three sons, his armor bearer, and his troops all died together that same day.

7 When the Israelites on the other side of the Jezreel Valley and beyond the Jordan saw that the Israelite army had fled and that Saul and his sons were dead, they abandoned their towns and fled. So the Philistines moved in and occupied their towns.

8 The next day, when the Philistines went out to strip the dead, they found the bodies of Saul and his three sons on Mount Gilboa. 9 So they cut off Saul’s head and stripped off his armor. Then they proclaimed the good news of Saul’s death in their pagan temple and to the people throughout the land of Philistia. 10 They placed his armor in the temple of the Ashtoreths, and they fastened his body to the wall of the city of Beth-shan.

11 But when the people of Jabesh-gilead heard what the Philistines had done to Saul, 12 all their mighty warriors traveled through the night to Beth-shan and took the bodies of Saul and his sons down from the wall. They brought them to Jabesh, where they burned the bodies. 13 Then they took their bones and buried them beneath the tamarisk tree at Jabesh, and they fasted for seven days.

In this passage, we see the end of Saul’s life. It was a life of contrasts. Saul was tall, handsome, strong, rich and powerful, but all of these things were not enough to make him someone we should emulate. He was tall physically, but he was small in God’s eyes. He was handsome, but his persistent, unrepentant sins made him ugly. He was strong, but his lack of faith made him weak. He was rich in earthly treasures but he was spiritually bankrupt. He was powerful in that he could give orders to many but he couldn’t command their respect or allegiance. Saul looked good on the outside, but he was decaying on the inside. A right relationship with God and a strong character are much more valuable than a good looking exterior.

Lord, please help us to become a people that care about the things that matter. Let us ditch our infatuation with meaningless celebrity. Let us emulate those who have strong character and celebrate that. Let us be not like Saul or Kim but seek to be people who care less about image than we do about real things that matter and promote and celebrate and seek after those things. Help us to seek after you and your qualities, Oh God. Let us take a look at the things we celebrate and compare them to the qualities that You desire us to have. Let us be less like Saul and Kim and more like your Son, Jesus Christ. Let us care about the things that He taught us to care about.

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 30:1-31 (Part 3 of 3)
David Destroys the Amalekites

There are faces of our church that the public sees. First and foremost, there is our founding and senior pastor, Tim Bowman. He is the preaching pastor. He is the first person people think of when it comes to Calvary Church of The Quad Cities. He is an amazing preacher and public speaker. He’s been preaching now for 23 years and before that he was a member of a traveling Christian musical group for many years so he has been “on stage” for a long time. Although he says he still gets nervous (and if you don’t something’s wrong with you), he handles the public stage with an outward grace and ease that I admire. Another face of our church is Jeff Duncan, our worship pastor. He is a great musician and band leader and seems to handle the complex task of leading a band, playing an instrument, singing, all at the same time with great ease. Mariah Logan, our worship coordinator, and lead female singer is young but oh so talented as if she grew up on stage (and probably did considering her Bowman family heritage). Our youth pastor, Jordan Johnson, is effortless on stage and uses impromptu, spur of the moment humor on stage with ease to engage our audiences. Milton Mazariegos, the family pastor, the most senior and experienced of those of us who are staff pastor, is so warm and engaging on stage and can get the crowd stirred up with his passion. He makes it look effortless. Occasionally, in my position as a staff pastor (and director of business), I get the opportunity to be on stage. With me though since I don’t do it much, I am in awe of these guys and gals on staff who do it regularly. All of us though as stage personas and/or as pastors are the face of the church. That’s what people see and remember.

However, without the behind the scenes staff at Calvary, none of it would happen. And each of these people are essential to the functioning of the church. Sunday mornings or any event held at our church would fall flat on its face. Just this weekend (Friday and Saturday), we hosted an apologetics conference at the church. Though the touring conference provided much of its own support, there were just services that we, as the host church HAD to provide. There were two guys that knocked it out of the park in their leadership roles for this conference where we had about 1,100 people on our campus each day and with multiple breakout sessions on Saturday. Our whole building was in use for this conference. Logistical and operational support was led by Chad Vallejo. Common area set up and support, Room set up and support, and the breakdown of the same. He and Nate Hughes had a plan and executed it flawlessly. Without them, man what a mess that conference would have been. They made sure that the temperature in the building was properly regulated too. Made sure the trash was cleaned up and removed (and man how much trash 1,200 people can generate). Our entire staff chipped in last night to help Chad and his team to get the church whipped back into shape this morning. As well, for the conference, Ben Engle our media & communications manager, handled the unique video and audio needs for this conference with ease as if the one-time need of this conference were what we does daily, and working with people from the conference that he may never work with again. Making sure the audio visual needs in every room were set up was a big undertaking and it went off effortlessly.

That got me to thinking too about the daily operations of our church including our Sunday services. There are many people you do not see that work tirelessly each week to keep our church working so that it fulfills its purpose – reaching the world around us with the gospel of Jesus Christ. There is Kit Vargas, who has a job title but she really just does whatever is needed. She has worked tirelessly for the church for years. There is Nehemiah Mazariegos, the children’s church coordinator. He is a fun young guy who makes the children’s worship experience amazing. There is Sheila Zehr who is our church bookkeeper who makes sure the bills get paid on time and the contributions get posted to donor accounts. There is Jordan Bos who is our senior pastor’s administrative assistant and the church office receptionist. She is such a sweet young girl who just like Kit does whatever is necessary to make our church work. Ben and Chad I have already mentioned. They work tirelessly week in and week out not just for the conference I mentioned. Bev Hart makes our outreach ministries work. Our Spanish speaking members pastor, Manuel Morales – man what a heart he has for making our Spanish speaking members feel a part of the church and not isolated and provides them with discipleship tailored to their Hispanic background. Reece Bowman, the senior pastor’s son, works weekly to keep the church cleaned and sparkly. And then there are several volunteers who work at the church weekly to ensure the church operates well. And then…and then…there are our hundreds of Sunday morning volunteers who work from the parking team to greeters team to guest services to ushers to the security team and teams I cannot even think of right now. All of these people are unseen and work tirelessly to make our church able to shout the name of Jesus in the world around us. Without these people who do not care about being in the spotlight, these people who just love serving Jesus Christ, our church would not be who it is – a light in our community.

In my personal life, I think of my wife, Elena. Without her being the stay at home wife who handles almost every detail of our lives with ease and grace and humility, I would not be able to do what I do. She does not get thanked by me enough for all the little things that she does for me that make my life so much easier. I could not function without her. She takes care of the details of my life with grace and ease.

That’s what I thought of this morning – how we must celebrate those who act in support roles for those in the front lines. Let’s read 1 Samuel 30 together now with a specific eye toward vv. 24-25:

30 Three days later, when David and his men arrived home at their town of Ziklag, they found that the Amalekites had made a raid into the Negev and Ziklag; they had crushed Ziklag and burned it to the ground. 2 They had carried off the women and children and everyone else but without killing anyone.

3 When David and his men saw the ruins and realized what had happened to their families, 4 they wept until they could weep no more. 5 David’s two wives, Ahinoam from Jezreel and Abigail, the widow of Nabal from Carmel, were among those captured. 6 David was now in great danger because all his men were very bitter about losing their sons and daughters, and they began to talk of stoning him. But David found strength in the Lord his God.

7 Then he said to Abiathar the priest, “Bring me the ephod!” So Abiathar brought it. 8 Then David asked the Lord, “Should I chase after this band of raiders? Will I catch them?”

And the Lord told him, “Yes, go after them. You will surely recover everything that was taken from you!”

9 So David and his 600 men set out, and they came to the brook Besor. 10 But 200 of the men were too exhausted to cross the brook, so David continued the pursuit with 400 men.

11 Along the way they found an Egyptian man in a field and brought him to David. They gave him some bread to eat and water to drink. 12 They also gave him part of a fig cake and two clusters of raisins, for he hadn’t had anything to eat or drink for three days and nights. Before long his strength returned.

13 “To whom do you belong, and where do you come from?” David asked him.

“I am an Egyptian—the slave of an Amalekite,” he replied. “My master abandoned me three days ago because I was sick. 14 We were on our way back from raiding the Kerethites in the Negev, the territory of Judah, and the land of Caleb, and we had just burned Ziklag.”

15 “Will you lead me to this band of raiders?” David asked.

The young man replied, “If you take an oath in God’s name that you will not kill me or give me back to my master, then I will guide you to them.”

16 So he led David to them, and they found the Amalekites spread out across the fields, eating and drinking and dancing with joy because of the vast amount of plunder they had taken from the Philistines and the land of Judah. 17 David and his men rushed in among them and slaughtered them throughout that night and the entire next day until evening. None of the Amalekites escaped except 400 young men who fled on camels. 18 David got back everything the Amalekites had taken, and he rescued his two wives. 19 Nothing was missing: small or great, son or daughter, nor anything else that had been taken. David brought everything back. 20 He also recovered all the flocks and herds, and his men drove them ahead of the other livestock. “This plunder belongs to David!” they said.

21 Then David returned to the brook Besor and met up with the 200 men who had been left behind because they were too exhausted to go with him. They went out to meet David and his men, and David greeted them joyfully. 22 But some evil troublemakers among David’s men said, “They didn’t go with us, so they can’t have any of the plunder we recovered. Give them their wives and children, and tell them to be gone.”

23 But David said, “No, my brothers! Don’t be selfish with what the Lord has given us. He has kept us safe and helped us defeat the band of raiders that attacked us. 24 Who will listen when you talk like this? We share and share alike—those who go to battle and those who guard the equipment.” 25 From then on David made this a decree and regulation for Israel, and it is still followed today.

26 When he arrived at Ziklag, David sent part of the plunder to the elders of Judah, who were his friends. “Here is a present for you, taken from the Lord’s enemies,” he said.

27 The gifts were sent to the people of the following towns David had visited: Bethel, Ramoth-negev, Jattir, 28 Aroer, Siphmoth, Eshtemoa, 29 Racal,[a] the towns of the Jerahmeelites, the towns of the Kenites, 30 Hormah, Bor-ashan, Athach, 31 Hebron, and all the other places David and his men had visited.

In this passage today, we see an example of what became a law in the Israelite nation under David later when he become king. David made it a law that those who guarded the army’s camp and all its equipment were to be treated equally with those who fought in battle. Today, it in modern warfare, it takes several people to provide the support services needed for every soldier on the front lines of battle. In the church, we need to treat those who provide support services equally with those who are seen on stage at church events. Without those who provide logistical support, mechanical support, audio visual support, people management support, and other services, our Sunday services will not happen.

So, let’s take a hint from David and appreciate those who support us. Thank those who make your life easier and simpler. Value them. Appreciate them. Celebrate them. Jesus was the star of his earthly ministry and rightfully so. But while He was on earth, He was not above thanking those who supported Him. He knelt down and washed the feet of His disciples as much as a thank you as it was to teach them a visible lesson about being a servant. So, if you are not on the front lines of your church, my church, any church, I thank you for what you do. If you are a wife who supports her husband I thank you. If you are a mother who supports her children, I thank you. Let us remember to thank those who support us.

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 30:1-31 (Part 2 of 3)
David Destroys the Amalekites

You know back in the day when MTV actually played music videos all the time? Back in the day in the 80s, MTV was 24/7 with music videos. It was a new concept back in those days. As the 80s progressed, the music videos became very sophisticated. The best ones would tell the story of the song in video. Some of them became like short films and were award-worthy. I loved my MTV back in those days. When MTV was new and you were in your teens and twenties like I was in the 80s, you would have friends over, have a party, and sit down and watch MTV and conversations while mediocre videos would and then get quiet while the excellent ones played. We would watch MTV til the small hours of the morning. Most of what was on MTV was that good and that interesting and of course 80s music is still the best decade of music ever! I just loved the idea of concept videos to support a song. I loved that these artists would put as much effort into their music videos as they would producing their albums. The 80s era music videos inspired in me this idea of setting life to music and vice versa. Concept videos would run through my brain about portions of my life being set to music. You know…something happens in your life over a period of time, you think of a song that matches what happened and the mood it, and you orchestrate in your mind what the video would look like.

That kind of thought of the soundtrack video of your life kind of stuck with me past the 80s. One video idea that has stuck with me since salvation was the idea of doing unto the least of these, a concept video based on Matthew 25:31-46, The Parable of the Sheep and Goats. The video I had in my mind was a concept video about our missed opportunities, our missed divine appointments, to help those who seem like throwaway people to us. Those moments where, in the busy schedule of our lives, that we think of helping but rationalize away why we cannot.

Here’s how that concept video would look. Say for example, there would be this homeless man sitting by a lamppost in any town in America, you pick the town, maybe your own town, maybe my own town. He has a sign held in front of him that says “Please help me. I am hungry.” You seem him but do not look directly in his eyes. You think of helping but choose not to, because, looking at your watch, you realize that you are late for meeting up with your friends at the bar for dinner. Your heart tells you to stop but you rationalize it away and walk on buy. As get past the man and you no longer can see him as you have walked far enough past him, the video pans back to the homeless man and then he morphs into Jesus Christ and He has a tear in his beginning to stream down his cheek. That idea just blows me away. And then the video shows this guy would not help missing other opportunities as well. An old lady trying to climb the steps of a public building, a mother trying to corral her kids that are acting all anarchical, a family that appears to be living in their car, and all sorts of other missed opportunities. Each time as the guy in this video passes by, each time the one needing help morphs into Jesus Christ.

We all have divine opportunities to help others. Most times, we rationalize away helping. We are too busy. The person might try to rob us. I am late for work. I am late for something. I am no different than anybody else. I miss more opportunities than I take advantage of. Just within the last two days, I have had two opportunities. One missed. One taken. On the way home from work on Thursday (which since I am a pastor now is the beginning of my weekend). Sundays, of course are work days for pastors. We get Friday and Saturday off instead of the usual Saturday and Sunday. But on the way home, after a long work week, I was ready to have some time off with my wife. I just wanted to get home put a t-shirt and my sweatpants on and chill. Thursday evenings, Elena and I get to catch up. We don’t usually go anywhere. We just enjoy having the beginning of time off where we can spend time together. I look forward to it. I dart home after work. We might go out to eat and some form of entertainment on Friday night or Saturday night but Thursday night is our night to chill out. As I was turning off of John Deere Road onto 7th Street, my usual track home, there was a guy in the turning lane standing by a car with the hood up. He was stranded. Steam coming out of the engine. Right in the middle of a Quad City rush hour. I rationalized away that he had called someone already to help him. I felt the tug to help but I blew it. I just drove around his car and kept going. Elena was waiting for me at home patiently. It was the beginning of my weekend. I blew it. I didn’t stop to help. Fear told me that he might try to rob me. Inconvenience told me that it would be difficult to park anywhere near him and help him. You name the reason, I came up with it. Later as I had passed, in the concept video of my mind, that helpless man by the car turned into Jesus Christ with a tear in his eye.

Then, last night, as we were leaving The Truth Conference, the apologetics conference being hosted at Calvary Church, we were in our car leaving the rear parking lot of the church. We saw this little old lady who must have been in her 80s at least. She was walking on the concrete parking lot at a glacial pace. Wherever she was headed in our parking lot, it was going to take a loooonnnngggg time for her to get there. She was walking THAT slow. She seemed as if the walk was causing her pain. This time. This time I stopped. Elena and I both got out the car and asked her if we could give her a lift to wherever her car was parked. It took a long time to (1) convince her to let us give her a ride and (2) get her up into the back seat of my SUV (that sits fairly high off the ground – higher for sure than a regular car). Then, she could not remember where she parked. By talking to her, we figured she must’ve parked at the front of the church parking lot nearer to 53rd Street, the main road that runs by our church. She was using her clicker to watch for which car’s lights lit up. We knew from our discussion that she drove a gray Malibu. We slowly crept along and finally found her car. We helped her slowly get out of our car and then into hers. By the time, we finished helping her, the parking lot was almost empty of the cars that brought almost a thousand people to our church for the conference being put on by this touring apologetics conference. As we drove away, I imagined by concept video in my mind. That little old lady morphed into Jesus Christ and this time he had a smile on His face.

That concept video idea was what came to mind this morning as I read through 1 Samuel 30 for a second of four reads. That idea of helping people that seem insignificant to us and that we rationalize away not helping. That idea of having impact on somebody’s life that we may never know. I think about getting to heaven and having someone there tell me how that day I did not help them caused their live to spiral downward or having someone there tell me how that I day I did help them changed the course of their life for the better. Having someone in heaven tell me that because I stopped to help them that it changed their view of “church people” and they started going to church after that and they came to know Jesus Christ as their Savior. And everything changed after that. Everything. For the better. That concept video of Jesus crying. That idea of having to account for all our missed opportunities to put the gospel in action every day. That’s what I thought of this morning. Let’s read 1 Samuel 30 together now with a specific eye toward vv. 11-15:

30 Three days later, when David and his men arrived home at their town of Ziklag, they found that the Amalekites had made a raid into the Negev and Ziklag; they had crushed Ziklag and burned it to the ground. 2 They had carried off the women and children and everyone else but without killing anyone.

3 When David and his men saw the ruins and realized what had happened to their families, 4 they wept until they could weep no more. 5 David’s two wives, Ahinoam from Jezreel and Abigail, the widow of Nabal from Carmel, were among those captured. 6 David was now in great danger because all his men were very bitter about losing their sons and daughters, and they began to talk of stoning him. But David found strength in the Lord his God.

7 Then he said to Abiathar the priest, “Bring me the ephod!” So Abiathar brought it. 8 Then David asked the Lord, “Should I chase after this band of raiders? Will I catch them?”

And the Lord told him, “Yes, go after them. You will surely recover everything that was taken from you!”

9 So David and his 600 men set out, and they came to the brook Besor. 10 But 200 of the men were too exhausted to cross the brook, so David continued the pursuit with 400 men.

11 Along the way they found an Egyptian man in a field and brought him to David. They gave him some bread to eat and water to drink. 12 They also gave him part of a fig cake and two clusters of raisins, for he hadn’t had anything to eat or drink for three days and nights. Before long his strength returned.

13 “To whom do you belong, and where do you come from?” David asked him.

“I am an Egyptian—the slave of an Amalekite,” he replied. “My master abandoned me three days ago because I was sick. 14 We were on our way back from raiding the Kerethites in the Negev, the territory of Judah, and the land of Caleb, and we had just burned Ziklag.”

15 “Will you lead me to this band of raiders?” David asked.

The young man replied, “If you take an oath in God’s name that you will not kill me or give me back to my master, then I will guide you to them.”

16 So he led David to them, and they found the Amalekites spread out across the fields, eating and drinking and dancing with joy because of the vast amount of plunder they had taken from the Philistines and the land of Judah. 17 David and his men rushed in among them and slaughtered them throughout that night and the entire next day until evening. None of the Amalekites escaped except 400 young men who fled on camels. 18 David got back everything the Amalekites had taken, and he rescued his two wives. 19 Nothing was missing: small or great, son or daughter, nor anything else that had been taken. David brought everything back. 20 He also recovered all the flocks and herds, and his men drove them ahead of the other livestock. “This plunder belongs to David!” they said.

21 Then David returned to the brook Besor and met up with the 200 men who had been left behind because they were too exhausted to go with him. They went out to meet David and his men, and David greeted them joyfully. 22 But some evil troublemakers among David’s men said, “They didn’t go with us, so they can’t have any of the plunder we recovered. Give them their wives and children, and tell them to be gone.”

23 But David said, “No, my brothers! Don’t be selfish with what the Lord has given us. He has kept us safe and helped us defeat the band of raiders that attacked us. 24 Who will listen when you talk like this? We share and share alike—those who go to battle and those who guard the equipment.” 25 From then on David made this a decree and regulation for Israel, and it is still followed today.

26 When he arrived at Ziklag, David sent part of the plunder to the elders of Judah, who were his friends. “Here is a present for you, taken from the Lord’s enemies,” he said.

27 The gifts were sent to the people of the following towns David had visited: Bethel, Ramoth-negev, Jattir, 28 Aroer, Siphmoth, Eshtemoa, 29 Racal,[a] the towns of the Jerahmeelites, the towns of the Kenites, 30 Hormah, Bor-ashan, Athach, 31 Hebron, and all the other places David and his men had visited.

In this passage today, we look specifically at vv. 11-15. Here, the cruelty of the Amalekites was such that they left this slave to die, but God used him to lead David and his men to the Amalekite camp. David and his men treated the young man kindly, and he returned the kindness by leading them to the enemy. These verses remind us that we are to treat those you meet with respect and dignity no matter how insignificant they may seem. You never know how God will use them in your life or how God will use our interaction with others in their lives going forward. Galatians 6:9 reminds us to never grow weary of doing good. We just might change someone’s life by helping. We may point someone to Jesus Christ. We may point some lonely, down and out believer toward fellowship again with believers that changes everything for them. They may morph into Jesus after we pass and He will smile.

Lord, help us to be aware of the inconvenient and fearful opportunities you place before us as divine opportunities to share the gospel. Help us not to miss these opportunities. Help us to seize them without fear or thoughts of inconvenience. Help us to see you when we stop to help someone in need. Help us to be like David here in this passage. He was blessed immediately by it in a tangible way. But help us Lord to realize that we may get nothing out of it on this side of heaven but that we are helping you when we help others. Help us, oh Lord, to see you when we see someone in need. Help us to realize that our kindness could be the difference in someone coming to Christ or not. Help us to have eternity in mind when we stop to help someone.

Amen and Amen.

1 Samuel 30:1-31 (Part 1 of 3)
David Destroys the Amalekites

Have you ever had a situation like David has in this passage? He comes back to his temporary home town after being told to go home from battle and then finds his town destroyed and all the wives and children of David’s elite fighting force and of David himself gone, taken away by the Amalekite raiders. He has a bad experience at the battlefront only to return home to find that his village had been sacked and all the people taken away. It was a ghost town of rubble and burned out huts and buildings. Things had gone from bad to worse. What would you do in his shoes? What would be your reaction?

Our natural inclination would be to lash out without thinking. I know that would be my first inclination. I am flesh and blood just like anybody else. If someone had purposefully tried to destroy something that was dear to me and then try to hurt my family in some way, that inner rage that is in us all would rise up in me quickly and cause me to want to lash out. However, my first nature is to avoid conflict. I have never been one to seek out conflict. I often try to avoid conflict at all costs, often to the detriment to what is right and true or at least what is best for me. I hate conflict. I am a pretty easy going, why can’t we all get along kind of guy. I am certainly not trying to say I am a saint or anything but I am one of those people who is deathly afraid of conflict. Like I said, I will avoid it for as long as I can and in as many ways as I can until I am forced to deal with a conflict head on. I guess I am just a person who likes things to be calm and peaceful and will avoid conflict and shy away from it just to keep things going along calmly. It is almost to the point of a character flaw and maybe it is one that my desire to avoid conflict sometimes hampers my leadership ability. However, sometimes in life, conflict is unavoidable. Sometimes, in a world of 7 billion souls with different interests and different priorities conflict is bound to happen no matter if you are a born conflict avoider like me or if you have an naturally aggressive personality. That’s just life. That’s just the way it is.

Sometimes, life just puts you in situations where there is reason for conflict. David is in one of those situations here. You and I will find those unavoidable situations during our lifetime. For me, they make me as nervous as a cat on a hot tin roof because of my nature of wanting to avoid conflict. Sometimes, though, you just can’t avoid it. If you are like me, there are those days where someone either purposefully or by accident “gets your goat”. There are times when you just have to respond in some way. I have had those kind of situations in life. You just can’t avoid it. There’s an old saying that seems appropriate – life is not so much what happens to you but how you respond to it. Sometimes, people purposefully hurt you or your family – like this situation with David. Our natural inclination is to lash out. Our natural inclination is to charge off into the breach without thinking. Even a conflict avoider like me has those moments where circumstances demand a response from us and even conflict avoiders want to lash out at those who have either by will or by accident have hurt us in some way.

David’s got that choice here. We have that choice in times of conflict. How do we respond? Do we lash out with some knee jerk reaction? That is often how we handle things. That’s what I thought of this morning. How would I respond to this situation if I was in David’s shoes? He was having a bad couple of days here. He just got rejected and sent home from the battlefront. Now, he gets home and finds it purposefully destroyed. What would he do? What would I do in that situation? Let’s read 1 Samuel 30 together now:

30 Three days later, when David and his men arrived home at their town of Ziklag, they found that the Amalekites had made a raid into the Negev and Ziklag; they had crushed Ziklag and burned it to the ground. 2 They had carried off the women and children and everyone else but without killing anyone.

3 When David and his men saw the ruins and realized what had happened to their families, 4 they wept until they could weep no more. 5 David’s two wives, Ahinoam from Jezreel and Abigail, the widow of Nabal from Carmel, were among those captured. 6 David was now in great danger because all his men were very bitter about losing their sons and daughters, and they began to talk of stoning him. But David found strength in the Lord his God.

7 Then he said to Abiathar the priest, “Bring me the ephod!” So Abiathar brought it. 8 Then David asked the Lord, “Should I chase after this band of raiders? Will I catch them?”

And the Lord told him, “Yes, go after them. You will surely recover everything that was taken from you!”

9 So David and his 600 men set out, and they came to the brook Besor. 10 But 200 of the men were too exhausted to cross the brook, so David continued the pursuit with 400 men.

11 Along the way they found an Egyptian man in a field and brought him to David. They gave him some bread to eat and water to drink. 12 They also gave him part of a fig cake and two clusters of raisins, for he hadn’t had anything to eat or drink for three days and nights. Before long his strength returned.

13 “To whom do you belong, and where do you come from?” David asked him.

“I am an Egyptian—the slave of an Amalekite,” he replied. “My master abandoned me three days ago because I was sick. 14 We were on our way back from raiding the Kerethites in the Negev, the territory of Judah, and the land of Caleb, and we had just burned Ziklag.”

15 “Will you lead me to this band of raiders?” David asked.

The young man replied, “If you take an oath in God’s name that you will not kill me or give me back to my master, then I will guide you to them.”

16 So he led David to them, and they found the Amalekites spread out across the fields, eating and drinking and dancing with joy because of the vast amount of plunder they had taken from the Philistines and the land of Judah. 17 David and his men rushed in among them and slaughtered them throughout that night and the entire next day until evening. None of the Amalekites escaped except 400 young men who fled on camels. 18 David got back everything the Amalekites had taken, and he rescued his two wives. 19 Nothing was missing: small or great, son or daughter, nor anything else that had been taken. David brought everything back. 20 He also recovered all the flocks and herds, and his men drove them ahead of the other livestock. “This plunder belongs to David!” they said.

21 Then David returned to the brook Besor and met up with the 200 men who had been left behind because they were too exhausted to go with him. They went out to meet David and his men, and David greeted them joyfully. 22 But some evil troublemakers among David’s men said, “They didn’t go with us, so they can’t have any of the plunder we recovered. Give them their wives and children, and tell them to be gone.”

23 But David said, “No, my brothers! Don’t be selfish with what the Lord has given us. He has kept us safe and helped us defeat the band of raiders that attacked us. 24 Who will listen when you talk like this? We share and share alike—those who go to battle and those who guard the equipment.” 25 From then on David made this a decree and regulation for Israel, and it is still followed today.

26 When he arrived at Ziklag, David sent part of the plunder to the elders of Judah, who were his friends. “Here is a present for you, taken from the Lord’s enemies,” he said.

27 The gifts were sent to the people of the following towns David had visited: Bethel, Ramoth-negev, Jattir, 28 Aroer, Siphmoth, Eshtemoa, 29 Racal,[a] the towns of the Jerahmeelites, the towns of the Kenites, 30 Hormah, Bor-ashan, Athach, 31 Hebron, and all the other places David and his men had visited.

In this passage, we find the answer of what David would do. He was put into a situation that by human nature was a no-brainer call for rage and an automatic knee-jerk reaction of retaliation. Most of us what fly off the handle and repay pain with pain. We would not think twice about a knee-jerk reaction of hurting someone for hurting you. What does David do?

He seeks the guidance of God. He prays. He seeks after what God wants him to do. Now there’s a novel plan for us all. I know that even for me, a conflict avoider to the point of it being a character flaw, there are times that conflict requires or demands a response from me. In those times, we must check ourselves the most. We must seek God. We must pray. Even when we are so angry that we don’t want to think about it and we just want to act and lash out in anger. Even then, we must seek the Lord. We must find what He wants us to do. We must seek to do His will. His will not ours.

Let us take heart of what David does here BEFORE he acts. He seeks God. He prays. He looks for God’s guidance in how to respond. No auto response here for David. He seeks after God. He lets God lead. Often we are like Saul (who always sought after his own passions and followed up with God later) and we should be like David (who sought after God and align his passions with God’s will). Man, this passage makes me admire David all the more. He was not perfect but man did he time and again seek God’s guidance before he acted (and when he didn’t it was always disastrous for him). That is the takeaway.

Seek God first before we act even when our soul cries out for acting in our own desires and passions.

 

Amen and Amen.